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ARLIS/NA 49th Annual Conference has ended
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Monday, April 26
 

1:00pm EDT

Artist Files SIG Meeting
Zoom meeting: https://princeton.zoom.us/j/98366712166 

Moderators
Monday April 26, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Digital Humanities SIG
The emphasis of this meeting will be on wiki* projects, including wikipedia and wikidata, in art and architecture libraries. Consider registering for the related workshop hosted by the DH SIG, Wikidata for Art Librarians.

Please rsvp for zoom link here: https://forms.gle/4HjA3wGHPuR9VChc6

Contact: Megan Macken, megan.macken@okstate.edu

Moderators
MM

Megan Macken

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Oklahoma State University

Monday April 26, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
 
Tuesday, April 27
 

9:00am EDT

ARLIS/NA Ohio Valley Chapter Meeting
Meeting Agenda:

  • Approval of Fall 2020 Meeting minutes
  • Updating chapter bylaws to make our friends and student categories of membership official.
  • Archiving Chapter Documents
  • Revisiting hosting the national meeting
  • Fall 2021 meeting date & location

 Click here to register: https://forms.gle/pt577p1nm2YTBXw17

Tuesday April 27, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

ARLIS/NA Midstates Meeting
Moderators
MS

Mackenzie Salisbury

School of Art Institute of Chicago

Tuesday April 27, 2021 10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

12:00pm EDT

ARLIS/NA Texas-Mexico Chapter Business Meeting
Group: ARLIS/NA Texas-Mexico Chapter Business Meeting

Time: Apr 27, 2021 11:00 AM CST, 12:00 Noon EST, 9:00 am PST

Join Zoom Meeting: https://unt.zoom.us/j/83345810454

Meeting ID: 833 4581 0454
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Contact: Rebecca Barham, rebecca.barham@unt.edu, 940-597-3037

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Barham

Rebecca Barham

Art, Dance & Theatre Librarian, Unversity of North Texas

Tuesday April 27, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Mountain West Chapter Meeting
Moderators
Tuesday April 27, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

4:00pm EDT

Museum Division
Register to get the Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMtc--grjIrEtZtaslwwz_0HPZYGqNGkhtI  

The annual business meeting for the ARLIS/NA Museum Division. 4pm EDT/1pm PDT

Preliminary agenda:

Call/vote for a new Vice-Moderator

The New Art Museum Library panel presentation

New Business

Moderators
Tuesday April 27, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

4:00pm EDT

Stimulating Creativity in Practice SIG
Find out more about the SCIP SIG here: http://scip.arlisna.org/

Agenda for our meeting is forthcoming.

Moderators
Tuesday April 27, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
 
Wednesday, April 28
 

11:00am EDT

ARLIS/NA Cataloging Section Meeting
ARLIS/NA Cataloging Section Meeting

Wednesday, April 28th: 11:00am -12:00pm EST

Contacts: Zimra Panitz (zpanitz@sva.edu)  and  Sarah Hamerman  (hamerman@princeton.edu)

Zoom Link
https://sva.zoom.us/j/89484701861?pwd=eWVvWWdJQ292WjdVZWR0ZXlzRzE5QT09

Meeting ID: 894 8470 1861

Passcode: 486874

Moderators
SH

Sarah Hamerman

Metadata Librarian, Rare Books Specialty, Princeton University Library

Wednesday April 28, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

ARLIS/NA Editorial Board Annual Meeting
ARLIS/NA Editorial Board Annual Meeting

Contact: Roger Lawson, editorial director (r-lawson@nga.gov)

Topic: Editorial Board Annual Meeting

Time: Apr 28, 2021 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
 
Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/98070761315?pwd=eUFhQi9LeUZhaGowN3Vhays5b3hLZz09
 
Meeting ID: 980 7076 1315
Passcode: iyv9y7
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Meeting ID: 980 7076 1315
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Moderators
Wednesday April 28, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Collection Development SIG Meeting
Wednesday April 28, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Canada Chapter Meeting
Annual meeting of the Canada Chapter. All Canadian members and those interested in the Canada Chapter are welcome to attend. Please pre-register at the Zoom link provided.

Zoom meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMocuqgrTovHtVBJ48wyDUml9FUXDu8ZmeR 

Moderators
Wednesday April 28, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

4:00pm EDT

Retirement SIG Meeting
Contact Carol Terry cterry@risd.edu to register for the meeting and to get the Zoom link.

Moderators
Wednesday April 28, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
 
Thursday, April 29
 

11:00am EDT

ARLIS Central Plains Chapter Business Meeting
Zoom link

Thursday April 29, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

Web Archiving SIG Meeting
ARLIS/NA Web Archiving SIG Meeting

Thursday, April 29th: 1:00-2:00pm EST

Registration (for Zoom link): https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScp3Iq6Cp9YGvEv-smE_T8TmY6sxCQb_BDCQNNGcQHsx2ceGw/viewform

Contacts: Sumitra Duncan (duncan(at)frick.org) and Andrea Puccio (APuccio(at)clarkart.edu)


Moderators
avatar for Sumitra Duncan

Sumitra Duncan

Head, Web Archiving Program, Frick Art Reference Library

Thursday April 29, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

ARLIS/NA SoCal Chapter Meeting
Contact Jenna Dufour (Chair) dufourj@uci.edu

More details forthcoming. Saving the date for now!

Moderators
JD

Jenna Dufour

Research Librarian for Visual Arts, University of California, Irvine

Thursday April 29, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Art Librarian Parents and Caregivers (ALPACA) SIG
The mission of the Art Librarian PArents and CAregivers special interest group is to provide support and distribute professional resources for art librarians who deal with the simultaneous challenges of negotiating one’s role in the profession while raising and caring for a family. We seek to support this demographic by providing a forum for discussing federal and state family leave laws, flex-time, professional development, tenure or similar requirements, work-life balance, the negotiation of equal pay, better benefits, and improved childcare options, among other activities. All are welcome.

Please register here to receive the Zoom information for our upcoming meeting on Thursday, April 29th, 2:00-3:00 pm EST. After registering, we will email you with the Zoom link and password to join the SIG meeting. Thank you!

Thursday April 29, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Fashion, Textile, and Costume SIG Business Meeting
Thursday April 29, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

4:00pm EDT

Management SIG Meeting
Management SIG Meeting

Thursday , April 29th: 4:00pm -5:00pm EST

Contacts: Caitlin Kilgallen (ckilgallen@sva edu)

Caitlin Kilgallen is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Management SIG
Time: Apr 29, 2021 04:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://sva.zoom.us/j/88634548928?pwd=NC90VzZKbzljK2NnbHo3NDhaZ0FIdz09

Meeting ID: 886 3454 8928
Passcode: 38022122
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Meeting ID: 886 3454 8928
Find your local number: https://sva.zoom.us/u/kcce766o0n


Thursday April 29, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

6:00pm EDT

ARLIS/NA NorCal Chapter Meeting
contact: Lynn Cunningham lynncunningham@berkeley.edu

Zoom. rsvp for meeting link: https://forms.gle/vcgjqBtoSVnZQogQA

Moderators
LC

Lynn Cunningham

Art Librarian, University of California Berkeley

Thursday April 29, 2021 6:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
 
Friday, April 30
 

11:00am EDT

Membership Committee Meeting
Zoom meeting: https://zoom.us/j/94280204585?pwd=cU1DUS9ybGZRaS9ad21FaFNqTGQ1UT09

Meeting ID: 942 8020 4585

Passcode: y371cg

Friday April 30, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Year-Long Mentoring Program Workshop
Workshop hosted by the ARLIS Mentoring Subcommittee for Year-long Mentoring Program participants (both mentors, and mentees).

Zoom meeting: TBD

Moderators
avatar for Madison Sullivan

Madison Sullivan

Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Washington

Friday April 30, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Chapter Leaders Meeting
Moderators
Friday April 30, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
 
Monday, May 3
 

10:00am EDT

Southeast Chapter Meeting
ARLIS Southeast Chapter Business Meeting

Monday, May 10, 10:00-11:00AM

Registration link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSczwFk7Fgw00tPmymVdK5GpYdTnal1mXDDIJ153s2Kx8v--lA/viewform

zoom (link tbd)

Lindsey Reynolds, president: lwreyn@uga.edu

Moderators
LR

Lindsey Reynolds

Dodd Librarian, President

Monday May 3, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

1:00pm EDT

Chapter Leaders Meeting
Moderators
Monday May 3, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Twin Cities Chapter's Meeting
ARLIS/NA-Twin Cities Chapter Meeting

1 pm Central / 2 pm Eastern

Contact: Jennifer Riestenberg; jennifer.riestenberg@walkerart.org

RSVP Here: https://forms.gle/E44WSELJC6AgJbBZA

Zoom meeting

Moderators
JR

Jennifer Riestenberg

Assistant Librarian, Walker Art Center

Monday May 3, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Cataloging Advisory Committee
Register here for Zoom link.  Contact Andrea Puccio with any questions.

Moderators
Monday May 3, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Teaching SIG Meeting
Join Zoom Meeting
https://uncw.zoom.us/j/83774669206?pwd=K21qM2hiOHpOUk9IeEVOSlJ2VW5Tdz09

Meeting ID: 837 7466 9206
Passcode: 860176
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Meeting ID: 837 7466 9206
Find your local number: https://uncw.zoom.us/u/kdLV7yCHok

Join by SIP
83774669206@zoomcrc.com

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Meeting ID: 837 7466 9206
Passcode: 860176

Monday May 3, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

4:00pm EDT

ArLiSNAP Section Annual Meeting
Join us for the  ArLiSNAP Annual Meeting + Pre-Conference Social Hour! For Zoom security purposes, please register using this form for either or both events by Monday, 5/3 at 10:00 AM EDT. We will send Zoom information and the agenda for the Annual Meeting shortly after that deadline prior to the meeting’s start time.

We look forward to seeing you there!
Alex O'Keefe + Chaun Campos, ArLiSNAP Co-Moderators

Moderators
Monday May 3, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
 
Tuesday, May 4
 

11:00am EDT

RISS Section Meeting
Annual RISS Section Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/94467420927?pwd=NGxtM09WeUM3TFM2STlMRnJ2K2UrZz09

Meeting ID: 944 6742 0927

Passcode: M6MGK9

Tuesday May 4, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

IRC Committee Meeting
ARLIS/NA International Relations Committee Meeting
Gabrielle Reed is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.
Topic: IRC annual conference meeting
Time: May 4, 2021 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Join Zoom Meeting
https://massart.zoom.us/j/83637137392
Meeting ID: 836 3713 7392
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Meeting ID: 836 3713 7392
Find your local number: https://massart.zoom.us/u/kbF7KWCqO6
Contact - Gabrielle Reed gabrielle.reed@massart.edu
Agenda forthcoming

Moderators
Tuesday May 4, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Graphic Novels SIG Meeting
Zoom meeting: https://txstate.zoom.us/j/96628435680 

Moderators
CM

Caitlin McGurk

Associate Curator, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
avatar for Tara S. Smith

Tara S. Smith

Research, Instruction & Outreach Librarian, Art & Design Librarian, Anthropology Librarian, Communication Studies Librar, Texas State University Alkek Library - Rio
Tara is also the Co-coordinator of the Graphic Novels SIG. 

Tuesday May 4, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

PDC/EDU Subcommittee Business Meeting

Tuesday May 4, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Decorative Arts SIG Quarterly Meeting
Quarterly meeting for the Decorative Arts Special Interest Group - all are welcome!

Please RSVP to receive the Zoom link for the meeting:  https://forms.gle/SUaDpS8dd3bBK1h1A

The meeting link and agenda will be sent out on May 3.

Tuesday May 4, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Documentation Committee Business Meeting
Documentation Committee Business Meeting
Zoom link TK

PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Tuesday May 4, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
 
Wednesday, May 5
 

10:00am EDT

Upstate New York Chapter Business Meeting
PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Wednesday May 5, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

11:00am EDT

Advocacy & Public Policy Committee Meeting
PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Wednesday May 5, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

12:00pm EDT

Classics and Archaeology SIG
During this annual meeting we are pleased to host a discussion on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in art libraries that support Classics, Archaeology, and Art History of pre-modern periods. Our guest speaker is Prof. Roland Betancourt,  University of California Irvine, who works on issues of sexuality, gender, and race in Byzantine art and culture.

PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Contacts: Isotta Poggi <ipoggi@getty.edu> and Clare Hills-Nova <clare.hills-nova@bodleian.ox.ac.uk>

Moderators
Wednesday May 5, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

Intersectional Feminism SIG
The Intersectional Feminism & Art Special Interest Group is dedicated to working within the ARLIS/NA community and library, archive, and information communities at-large to improve coverage and raise awareness of women artists and designers. It serves as a forum for discussion on how gender relates to various aspects of these fields—including cataloging, collection development, research, instruction, and more. The Intersectional Feminism & Art SIG also serves as a resource by promoting new research and affiliated collections, institutions, and initiatives. We are LGBTQIA+ inclusive and invite people of all gender identities and expressions to participate.
https://getty.zoom.us/j/98624446955?pwd=YWtPT3NuZGdsbENhMi9OVHNYNmdtUT09
Meeting ID: 986 2444 6955
Passcode: 407797

Contacts: Shea'la Finch sfinch@sva.edu and Annalise Welte awelte@getty.edu



Moderators
Wednesday May 5, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Academic Division Meeting
Join the Academic Division for our annual business meeting on Wednesday, March 5, at 2 pm EST.
The meeting agenda can be accessed here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10HKsYdFx07ryqIyToOtkOgYrqx7goItGBAH2BJusfeE/edit?usp=sharing

Zoom meeting: https://yalelibrary.zoom.us/j/92959408089?pwd=V3RpMDZXOHJwSk5pWUZyUDFES28zZz09

Contact the division moderator, Courtney Baron, at courtney.baron@louisville.edu if you have any questions!

Moderators
Wednesday May 5, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Space Planning SIG
Please register here to receive the zoom link :  https://forms.gle/Z4fWv886F1PLSUNr7

Contact person:
Catherine Robertson
catherine_robertson@pem.org

Wednesday May 5, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
 
Thursday, May 6
 

11:00am EDT

New England Chapter Business Meeting
PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Thursday May 6, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

12:00pm EDT

Architecture and Planning Section Meeting
Contacts: Kai Alexis Smith and Stephanie Beene

Annual Business Meeting

PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Moderators
Thursday May 6, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

Affiliated Organization Liaisons Meeting
Contact Amy Trendler with questions. aetrendler@bsu.edu

Art Libraries Society of North America is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.
 
Topic: Affiliated Organization Liaisons Meeting
Time: May 6, 2021 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
 
Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/91980769798?pwd=ZW1pRG1KYmU1TlE4NGtjTkVsRTAzQT09
 
Meeting ID: 919 8076 9798
Passcode: Fn1mgy
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Meeting ID: 919 8076 9798
Passcode: 769589
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/abRUAq9Yzs
 
Art Libraries Society of North America is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Moderators
Thursday May 6, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

ARLIS/NA Northwest Chapter Business Meeting
Contact nw.arlisna@gmail.com to RSVP.

Zoom (RSVP for link)

The agenda and Zoom link will be sent out a few days before the meeting.

PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS



Thursday May 6, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Mid-Atlantic Chapter Business Meeting
Zoom link: https://virginiatech.zoom.us/meeting/88348747452 

Moderators
CC

Cathryn Copper

Mid-Atlantic Chapter Chair

Thursday May 6, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

5:00pm EDT

New York Chapter Meeting
PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Thursday May 6, 2021 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
 
Friday, May 7
 

11:00am EDT

Diversity & Inclusion Committee Business Meeting
Diversity & Inclusion Committee Business Meeting

Time: May 7, 2021 11:00 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Please RSVP via this form to receive the link to the Zoom meeting: https://forms.gle/WecCRD5oB4ATkwnc8

The meeting agenda and Zoom link will be sent out the day before, on May 6.


Friday May 7, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

Book Art SIG meeting
Book Art SIG meeting
Join Zoom Meeting
https://baylor.zoom.us/j/89500382141?pwd=UVhFSWc1U0xLcUFTNGFaUjRBTjIvQT09
 
Meeting ID: 895 0038 2141
Passcode: 812390
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Moderators
Friday May 7, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

50 Years of ARLIS/NA Timeline Planning Meeting
In preparation for the 50th anniversary of ARLIS/NA in 2022, we will be creating a visual timeline of the organization.

Please join us for a planning meeting on May 7th at 2 pm ET. All are welcome!

Register using this form: https://forms.gle/LTEiCttXVTcr7oBz8
Zoom link will be sent out on May 6th.

The committee is looking for contributions. Please let us know what you have in this form: https://forms.gle/e7imGmS4euwwrGy79

Moderators
avatar for Karina Wilhelm

Karina Wilhelm

Arizona State University, Design and the Arts Library

Friday May 7, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Auction Catalogs SIG
Registration and Survey for Zoom link via google forms https://forms.gle/kpjLMeBnQpAwmpYn8

Contact: tina.lidogoster(at)metmuseum.org

Moderators
Friday May 7, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

3:00pm EDT

Exhibitions SIG Business Meeting
Zoom meeting

PLEASE CONTACT THE MEETING ORGANIZERS FOR MORE DETAILS

Friday May 7, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

4:00pm EDT

ArLiSNAP Social Hour
Meet new people or see old ‘conference buddies’ at the ArLiSNAP Social Hour! This social space hosted by the  Art Libraries Student and New Professional section of ARLIS/NA is an opportunity to connect with other students and new professionals and get excited for the conference together. We may not be able to meet in person for our traditional happy hour at a local spot, but we look forward to folks joining virtually wherever they are!

For event link, send an email to ArLiSNAP.

ArLiSNAP - arlisnap.na@gmail.com

Friday May 7, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
 
Monday, May 10
 

TBA

HOW TO USE THIS SCHED FOR THE CONFERENCE / COMMENT SERVIR DE SCHED POUR LA CONFÉRENCE
The ARLIS/NA 49th Annual Conference Sched is intended as a tool to help attendees to plan their conference experience, and as long-term documentation of the conference itself.

Attendees can select the activities they wish to participate in, and save them to MySched as a memory aid.

All conference presentations will be broadcast thru our virtual platform, ShowCare, which uses Zoom webinar. ShowCare will link out to Sched so you can easily access both sites over conference dates! The conference platform is live : https://arlisna21.showcare.io/

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Le calendrier Sched de la 49e conférence annuelle d'ARLIS/NA est conçu comme un outil pour aider les participants à planifier leur expérience de la conférence, et pour documenter la conférence à long terme.

Les participants peuvent sélectionner les activités auxquelles ils souhaitent participer et les enregistrer dans MySched comme aide-mémoire.

Toutes les présentations de la conférence seront diffusées par notre platforme virtuelle ShowCare en utilisant le webinaire Zoom. ShowCare sera lié au calendrier Sched pour que vous puissiez facilement accéder aux deux sites pendant toute la durée de la conférence! La plateforme de la conférence est maintenant en ligne : https://arlisna21.showcare.io/



Monday May 10, 2021 TBA

10:30am EDT

From Moscow to Montreal: Highlights of the Russian Special Collections at the Canadian Centre for Architecture
Over the past forty years, the Canadian Centre for Architecture has acquired significant holdings of books, periodicals, and photographs as well as selected prints, drawings, and archival materials related to Russian and East European architecture, architectural history, and urban and regional planning from the eighteenth century to the present. Its collection of Russian and East European avant-garde books, journals, photographs, and drawings, and its holdings of Soviet architecture publications, are particularly outstanding. Selected items have been showcased in exhibitions and publications, most prominently in the exhibitions Architectural Drawings of the Russian Avant-Garde, 1917-1935 and Soviet Avant-Garde Publications in 1991, The Anatomy of the Architectural Book in 2016, and Building a new New World: Amerikanizm in Russian Architecture, curated by Jean-Louis Cohen, in 2019 and 2020.

In this session, CCA reference librarian Tim Klähn will share some of his favourite highlights, and then architect and professor Jean-Louis Cohen will present on his recent CCA exhibition. A Q&A will follow.

The session is free and open to all. Register here.

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Au cours des quarante dernières années, le Centre Canadien d'Architecture a acquis d'importants fonds de livres, de périodiques et de photographies, ainsi qu'une sélection de gravures, de dessins et de documents d'archives liés à l'architecture russe et est-européenne, à l'histoire de l'architecture et à la planification urbaine et régionale du XVIIIe siècle à nos jours. Sa collection de livres, revues, photographies et dessins de l'avant-garde russe et est-européenne, ainsi que son fonds de publications sur l'architecture soviétique, sont particulièrement remarquables. Des pièces sélectionnées ont été présentées dans des expositions et des publications, notamment dans les expositions Dessins d'architecture de l'avant-garde russe, 1917-1935 et Publications de l'avant-garde soviétique en 1991, L’anatomie du livre d’architecture en 2016 et Construire un nouveau Nouveau Monde: L’amerikanizm dans l’architecture russe, sous le commissariat de Jean-Louis Cohen, en 2019 et 2020.

Au cours de cette session, Tim Klähn, bibliothécaire de référence au CCA, partagera quelques-uns de ses coups de cœur, puis l'architecte et professeur Jean-Louis Cohen présentera sa récente exposition au CCA. Une séance de questions-réponses suivra.

Cet séance est gratuite et ouverte à tous. Inscrivez-vous ici.

Speakers
TK

Tim Klähn

Reference Librarian (Canadian Centre for Architecture)
MD

Martien de Vletter

Associate Director, Collection (Canadian Centre for Architecture)
JC

Jean-Louis Cohen

Architect, Architectural Historian and Professor (NYU IFA)


Monday May 10, 2021 10:30am - 11:30am EDT

10:30am EDT

Leadership Institute
Libraries and archives are known as repositories of knowledge, objects, curiosities, and resources. They are also spaces for learning, growth, and exchange. To lead committees, task forces, or groups– especially in a time of massive social disruptions–librarians, archivists, and arts information workers must embrace their roles as community builders and vital curators of conversation. In professional settings, leaders can better build community by growing opportunities for shared learning, encouraging democratic approaches towards collaboration, and championing online gathering creativity.

For the 2021 Leadership Institute, we will be joined by Dr. Jennifer Wolowic, a visual anthropologist and Project Manager of the Simon Fraser University Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue’s Strengthening Canadian Democracy Initiative. Dr. Wolowic will share principles, tips, and case studies to inspire the growth of networks and leadership across ARLIS/NA.

The session will include a blend of presentation, reflection, and networking breakout conversations. The session will cover dialogue techniques for better meetings, principles of democratic engagement that apply to any organizing endeavour, and examples of innovative online events that build community.

ABOUT THE SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY MORRIS J. WOSK CENTRE FOR DIALOGUE

Since 2000, the SFU Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue has focused on democracy. The centre creates real world impact for society’s most pressing challenges by using dialogue and engagement to co-create solutions, exchange knowledge, support community-engaged learning, and build the capacity of others. Our staff, fellows, and associates are leaders in a diversity of fields. These include dialogue, participatory democracy, climate solutions, diversity and inclusion, public engagement, deliberative democracy, international security, systems change, decolonization, urban design and sustainable community development.

Sponsored by BERNETT PENKA RARE BOOKS

Moderators
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President

Speakers
DJ

Dr. Jennifer Wolowic

Project Manager, Simon Fraser University, Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue’s Strengthening Canadian Democracy Initiative



Monday May 10, 2021 10:30am - 12:30pm EDT
  Special event
  • SPONSOR BERNETT PENKA RARE BOOKS

10:30am EDT

Workshop I. ArLiSNAP Resume & CV
Organized by Art Library Students and New ARLIS/NA Professionals (ArLiSNAP), new professionals and students will collaboratively review their curriculum vitae (CV) and resumes as well as discuss job interview questions in this workshop. Attendees must bring their current CV and resumes for constructive feedback from both peers attending and a seasoned art library professional. The format will consist of dividing attendees into small breakout sessions to collectively review each other’s materials. Everyone in the group will offer feedback and discuss format, style, and content. Remaining time will be used for freeform discussion on job hunt questions with an experienced professional. This will be a unique learning opportunity for new professionals and students to gain insight from a seasoned professional and trade trips-and-tricks with their peers.

CAP: 25 attendees

Cost: $0

Monday May 10, 2021 10:30am - 12:30pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

First-Time Attendees and International Attendees Welcome Event
Reception hosted by Amy Trendler, ARLIS/NA President, the ARLIS/NA Membership Committee, and the International Relations Committee. Join other first-time conference attendees to mix and mingle with representatives from the ARLIS/NA leadership, who are excited to welcome you to this year’s conference. Our reception will take place in the virtual environment of REMO, which will allow you to move freely throughout the room, using your video and microphone or the chat function. You will have the option to personalize your online profile when logging in. Link will be available when the conference platform goes live. 

Speakers
BO

Beth Owens

Research and Scholarly Communications Librarian, Ingalls Library, Cleveland Museum of Art
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President


Monday May 10, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:30pm EDT

2:30pm EDT

Workshop II (FULLY-BOOKED): Wikidata for Art Librarians
This workshop presented will introduce participants to Wikidata with a special focus on representing art information as linked data. Wikidata is a free, open, and multilingual knowledge base that serves as the structured data for Wikipedia and other Wikimedia projects. Art information professionals use Wikidata to visualize data about their collections, identify new research topics, understand historic trends, and enable worldwide access to their collections.

In this workshop intended for beginners, Wiki Education instructor Will Kent will address the fundamental concepts of Wikidata, how to start editing, and ways Wikidata can enhance the work of art libraries and other GLAM institutions (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums). Participants will also be introduced to Wiki Education’s training modules as well as other resources, useful tools, and opportunities to continue building their skills and collaborate with an active GLAM community on Wikidata.

Moderators: Megan Macken and Karly WIldenhaus

Speaker: Will Kent

CAP: 50 attendees
Cost $25

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY-BOOKED

Moderators
MM

Megan Macken

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Oklahoma State University
KW

Karly Wildenhaus

Metadata Lead, Frick Art Reference Library

Speakers
avatar for Will Kent

Will Kent

Wikidata Program Manager, Wiki Education


Monday May 10, 2021 2:30pm - 4:30pm EDT

4:45pm EDT

Society Circle (by invitation)
Society Circle donors will receive an invitation to attend this reception. Our special guest speaker is Julian Armstrong, journalist and Quebec food writer.

About Julian Armstrong: As a veteran reporter and cookbook author Julian Armstrong has been reporting on food for newspapers for the better part of five decades and has covered everything from gastronomy and food prices, from nutrition to food safety. She was food editor of the Montreal Star and then of the Montreal Gazette, including three weekly columns. But Armstrong is happiest writing about Quebec cuisine, where the latest developments in food and drink and centuries-old culinary traditions co-exist in harmony in a province in which residents carry on an enduring love affair with food that is perhaps unique in the world. From the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean area to Charlevoix, from the Îles de la Madeleine to the upper Laurentians to the Beauce, Armstrong has researched the ways in which the original dishes of settlers from France have been adapted.
Armstrong is the author of Made In Quebec: A Culinary Journey (HarperCollins, 2014) and A Taste of Quebec (Macmillan, 1990, updated in 2001). She is a founding member of the Association of Food Journalists and of the Cuisine Canada culinary alliance (now known as Taste Canada) and she has judged countless chefs’ contests.

About Society Circle: The Society Circle was formed in 2003 to serve as the Society's fundraising organization. Anyone who donates to ARLIS/NA is automatically part of the Society’s giving circle. Society Circle members directly support the mission of ARLIS/NA through their contributions. A list of donation levels and benefits is on the Donate Now page.Your donations help support all areas of ARLIS/NA, including speaker awards for the annual conference, and internship award, and a study tour scholarship.




Moderators
avatar for Pierre B. Landry

Pierre B. Landry

CPAC Chair of Development, Historien de l’art
I am a freelance art historian living in Quebec City. I'm currently working on a book about Canadian artist Jean Paul Riopelle. I was formerly head of Collection and Information Management at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec, and associate curator of Canadian... Read More →
avatar for Gregory P J Most

Gregory P J Most

Chief, Department of Image Collections, National Gallery of Art
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President

Speakers
avatar for Julian Armstrong

Julian Armstrong

Journalist and Quebec Food Writer
Photo credit: Jacques Laurent


Monday May 10, 2021 4:45pm - 6:15pm EDT
 
Tuesday, May 11
 

9:00am EDT

Exhibit Hall Open
The Exhibit Hall is open throughout the conference and provides opportunities to network with conference vendors through open chat, news/activity feeds, one-on-one conversations or video calls, and with video demo rooms.

Tuesday May 11, 2021 9:00am - 4:30pm EDT

10:00am EDT

ARLIS/NA President's Welcome: Conference Kickoff & Opening Remarks
On behalf of the ARLIS/NA Executive board and the 2021 conference planning committee, I am pleased to invite you to participate in the 2021 ARLIS/NA Virtual Conference. Our conference theme is “Convergence = Créativité + Collaboration” and these ideas are woven throughout the program. Panel sessions, talks, discussion forums, and other events will feature new and continuing projects, explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on libraries and arts institutions, and showcase the scholarship of our members. Hosted by the ARLIS/NA MOQ (Montréal, Ottawa, Québec) Chapter, this year’s annual conference promises to be a dynamic online event that will feature highlights from the city, museums, and libraries of Montréal.

                                                                                                   -- Amy Trendler, ARLIS/NA President

Please join us for this welcoming event and conference kickoff.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President


Tuesday May 11, 2021 10:00am - 10:30am EDT

10:00am EDT

Posters On View
The 49th Annual ARLIS/NA conference showcases a wide range of thought-provoking posters highlighting innovative research by colleagues in the art information community. Posters can be viewed at any time throughout the conference. You are welcome to start a conversation with the poster exhibitors through direct messaging, comments, one-on-one video calls. Come back on Thursday May 13 for the Poster Finisssage at 2:30 PM when all poster exhibitors will be on hand for live Q&A.

LIST OF POSTERS AND PRESENTERS

Mapping a Transcendent Life: Using ArcGIS Storymaps to Showcase the Public Art, Monuments, and Murals of Muhammad Ali
Courtney Baron, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville

A Visual History of Quebec's CEGEP Libraries and Other Religious and Civic Building Conversions
Susan Bissonnette, Librarian for Information Sciences, Vanier College (CEGEP)

The Francis Bedford Archive: Nineteenth-Century Architectural Photography in England and Wales
Claralyn Burt, Digital Collections Specialist, Gonzaga University

The Sistine Chapel and the Panama Canal: Energy and Memory in Handmade Artists’ Books
Amanda Clark, Library Director, Whitworth University

The Information Literacy Course in Canadian MFA Programs
Sandra Cowan, Fine Arts Librarian, University of Lethbridge
Marissa Rocca, Student Learning and Engagement Librarian, Grande Prairie College

Every Subject Heading on 100 West Hastings St.
Ana Diab, Collections, Reference + Instruction Librarian, Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Assessing the Impact of Covid-19 on the Use of Art Print and Ebooks at an Academic Library
Mary Anne Dyer, Metadata Catalog Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
Emily Davis Winthrop, Art Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University

Pivoting in a Pandemic: Exploring the Art Book and Building Community in a Virtual Speaker Series
Jessica Evans Brady, Research & Collections Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
Shalimar Fojas White, Herman and Joan Suit Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

If You Can Write, You Can Draw! How I Reconnected with My Love of Drawing During the Pandemic
Jacqueline Fleming, Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian, Indiana University-Bloomington

Creating Accessible Academic Information for All with Wikipedia Editing in Undergraduate Art History Courses
Anna Harper, Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, California State University, Sacramento
Rachel Miller, Art History, California State University, Sacramento
Channing Corbin, B.A. Art History, Student, California State University, Sacramento

Job Sharing during Times of Crisis
Yuki Hibben, Interim Head of Special Collections and Archives & Curator of Books and Art, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

A Call for Connection and Collaboration in Information Literacy Instruction for Studio Arts
Ashley Huot, MLIS candidate at the University of Alberta with a background in studio arts, art education, and community development, University of Alberta (MLIS candidate)

Leveraging Research and Information Management (RIM) Systems in Support of Art and Architecture Faculty
Megan Macken, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Liaison to Art, Art History & Graphic Design, Oklahoma State University

The Kress Digital Archive: Collaboration, Context, and Connections
Shannon Morelli, Archivist, National Gallery of Art

Scan This to See a Cat: A Pilot for Digital Image Collections Outreach around Campus
Maggie Murphy, Visual Art & Humanities Librarian, UNC Greensboro
Brown Biggers, IT Operations Manager, UNC Greensboro

“Could We Work with the Library on This?”: Strategies for Increasing Departmental Engagement as a New Art Liaison Librarian
Claire Payne, Web Services and Data Librarian and Liaison to the Department of Art, Stony Brook University Libraries

Fresh Faces, Sticky Fingers: Public Programming at the Walker Art Center Library
Jennifer Riestenberg, Assistant Librarian, Walker Art Center

Virtual Teaching Collections on the Getty Research Portal: Digital Access Across Institutions
Megan Sallabedra, Research Associate, Getty Research Institute

Converging Fields: Connecting Creative Students to Information Literacy through Art and Design Pedagogies
Virginia Seymour, Research and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design

New Approaches to Embedded Librarianship with Interior Design during the Time of COVID-19
Leah Sherman, Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University

Roadblocks to Assessing Arts Collections for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion
Madison Sullivan, Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Washington

Changing the Arts Canon Through Curated BIPOC Research Guides
Aubree Tillett, Arts & Design Librarian Intern, University of Minnesota Libraries
Deborah Ultan, Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries

Welcome to the Black Art Library
Asmaa Walton, Founder, Black Art Library

Scaffolding Business Research Design Instruction for Art and Design Students
Andrew Wang, Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Oregon

Finding Our Way: Improving Discoverability of Native American and Indigenous Materials
Alice Whiteside, Head, Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Monica Figueroa, Interim Librarian for Inclusive Excellence, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Interpreting Desires: The Experiences of Artists in Archives
Lulu Zilinskas, Recent MLIS graduate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Tuesday May 11, 2021 10:00am - 5:00pm EDT

10:30am EDT

Opening Keynote Address: Grappling with the Colonial Archive: The Production and Circulation of Information in Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Canadian Slavery
Representations of Transatlantic Slavery in most media – like Hollywood films - gives the impression that corporal punishment was the main tool of social oppression. However, the terror which slave owners sought to inspire in the enslaved was also produced through the control of information and the strategic (mis)representation of the enslaved for the legal, social, and economic ends of mainly middle and upper class whites. This lecture will explore the nature of printed and manuscript sources created in the context of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Canadian Slavery to highlight the ways in which information was used to dehumanize and immobilize the enslaved. Concomitantly, the archive itself will be critiqued as a space through which enslaved human beings were deliberately documented as “incomplete entries”.

Speaker: Dr. Charmaine A. Nelson

Charmaine A. Nelson is a Professor of Art History and a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Transatlantic Black Diasporic Art and Community Engagement at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University in Halifax, CANADA where she is also the founding director of the first-ever institute focused on the study of Canadian Slavery. Prior to this appointment she worked at McGill University (Montreal) for seventeen years. Nelson has made ground-breaking contributions to the fields of the Visual Culture of Slavery, Race and Representation, and Black Canadian Studies. Nelson has published seven books including The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America (2007), Slavery, Geography, and Empire in Nineteenth-Century Marine Landscapes of Montreal and Jamaica (2016), and Towards an African Canadian Art History: Art, Memory, and Resistance (2018). She is actively engaged with lay audiences through her media work including ABC, CBC, CTV, and City TV News, The Boston Globe, BBC One’s “Fake or Fortune,” and PBS’ “Finding your Roots”. She blogs for the Huffington Post Canada and writes for The Walrus. In 2017, she was the William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Harvard University.

THIS PRESENTATION WILL NOT BE RECORDED

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Young

Rebecca Young

Director, NSCAD Library, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University

Speakers
avatar for Charmaine A. Nelson

Charmaine A. Nelson

Professor of Art History and a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Transatlantic Black Diasporic Art and Community Engagement, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University


Tuesday May 11, 2021 10:30am - 11:45am EDT

12:00pm EDT

01. Linked Data for Art Libraries: New Approaches to Metadata
This session will focus on the presentation and discussion of projects that implement linked data. Presentations about practical application of Wikidata/Wikimedia, BIBFRAME, and other linked data tools and methodologies will demonstrate the viability of linked data in art libraries and elucidate pathways towards the incorporation of linked data into library activity.

Rather than theoretical discussions of how linked data will impact libraries and discovery, this session will look at how linked data projects have been executed – and the resulting outcomes and workflows. The main intent of this session is to demonstrate viable and realistic ways that linked data has been applied to library projects and metadata. Through the presented strategies, resources, and workflows attendees will have concrete examples of how linked data is evolving and how it can be applied.

Moderators
Speakers
MS

Mary Seem

Lead Acquisitions Librarian, Frick Art Reference Library
JW

Jonathan Ward

Editor, Getty Research Institute
BZ

Benjami Zweig

Digital Projects Coordinator, National Gallery of Art


Tuesday May 11, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

12:00pm EDT

02. Curating, Creating, and Collecting: Conversations with Photobooks
Photobooks continue to evolve as a genre. At this panel presentation sponsored by the ARLIS Photography SIG, you will hear from colleagues who are interacting with photobooks in innovative ways via exhibits, collection building, and outreach. Tess Colwell will discuss the development of a photo book club at Yale University Library. Deborah Ultan will show an example student research project, a seed for future projects, that features the new University of Minnesota Libraries acquisition of the complete 21st Editions publications and publisher’s production archives. Dianne Weinthal will give an overview of an exhibit she created for the UCLA Arts Library, and will discuss how we can highlight more recent and historically overlooked works worthy of our collective attention.

Moderators
avatar for Robert Gore

Robert Gore

Visual Arts Librarian, UCLA Arts Library

Speakers
TC

Tess Colwell

Arts Librarian for Research Services, Yale University
avatar for Deborah Ultan

Deborah Ultan

Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
avatar for Dianne Weinthal

Dianne Weinthal

MLIS Candidate, 2020, UCLA


Tuesday May 11, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

12:00pm EDT

03. Put a Creative Spark in Your Leadership
Where do creativity and leadership intersect? What strategies and tools can we borrow from artists to improve or even transform our approaches to leadership? Using inspirational quotes and advice from a variety of visual and performing artists, designers and makers as well as from leadership literature, this interactive panel will invite participants to explore a variety of methods to use both at work and in developing and nurturing a personal creative practice. Being a leader doesn’t have to mean putting out your creative spark and, in fact, we argue that creativity is essential to being a great leader. Join us in exploring practical approaches and strategies that you can use individually and share with work teams and throughout your organization, such as positive reflection and envisioning, playful learning, and experimentation.


Moderators
MM

Megan Macken

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Oklahoma State University

Speakers
JC

Jill Chisnell

Architecture and Design Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Heather Gendron

Heather Gendron

Director, Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, Yale University Library
CN

Carol Ng-He

Digital Collections Curator, Center for the Art in East Asia, University of Chicago


Tuesday May 11, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

Exhibit Hall: Dedicated Exhibit Time
The Exhibit Hall is open throughout the conference and provides opportunities to network with conference vendors through open chat, news/activity feeds, one-on-one conversations or video calls, and with video demo rooms. This dedicated time slot takes place between conference sessions giving attendees a chance to browse or engage with vendors at their leisure.

Tuesday May 11, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

04. Telling Stories with Library Data: Visualization Projects and Tools
Libraries can leverage their data to create meaningful visual narratives and gain new insights about themselves. A case study of the use of Power BI, a powerful data visualization tool provided by Microsoft, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Watson Library explores how a library's data can be visualized to tell a compelling story. Transforming numbers into narratives gives stakeholders a deeper insight into the impact of the library. A second case study, Ensemble@Yale, highlights a crowdsourced transcription project that enlists volunteers to generate structured metadata from digitized performance programs in the archives. The ultimate goal is to create a searchable database of people and productions, as well as datasets for more experimental visualizations. A demonstration of tools including Power BI, Project Builder, OpenRefine, Gephi, and Tableau will highlight out-of-the-box options for data collection, cleaning, visualization, and sharing.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Alex O'Keefe

Alex O'Keefe

Research + Instruction Librarian, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
avatar for Michael Cummings

Michael Cummings

Assistant Museum Librarian, Systems, Metropolitan Museum of Art
avatar for Catherine Derose

Catherine Derose

Program Manager, Digital Humanities Lab, Yale University Library
avatar for Lindsay King

Lindsay King

Associate Director for Access and Research Services, Haas Arts Library, Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, Yale University
At the Haas Arts Library at Yale University, I oversee public services--including reference, instruction, outreach, and digital services--supporting students and faculty in art, history of art, architecture, drama, theater studies and dance. I am the library liaison and subject selector... Read More →
avatar for William Blueher

William Blueher

Watson Library, Metropolitan Museum of Art


Tuesday May 11, 2021 2:00pm - 3:20pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

05. Converging at a Time of Crisis: Adaptive Teaching Strategies
While adapting to rapid change is hardly a new challenge for art librarians, the COVID-19 pandemic has presented perhaps the most dramatic example of fundamental disruption in recent times. This led to some major challenges to be overcome, but also opportunities to develop and test new ideas. In this session, presenters will showcase a number of adaptive strategies for delivering services during this extraordinary period and share lessons learned. Presentations will cover topics including remote instruction, online orientations, and video tutorials.

Moderator: Marsha Taichman


Making an Impression: Teaching Letterpress History and Technique through Fostering Local Collaboration and Student Creativity

This presentation shares takeaways from my experience teaching a semester-long course on letterpress that aimed to introduce first-year students to campus resources and develop relationships with their peers. As a metadata librarian who works on digital collections, the pandemic offered an opportunity to highlight digital letterpress resources held by the university and institutions across the state. Librarians who do not have liaison or instruction responsibilities but who want to find opportunities to teach may find this presentation particularly applicable. Teaching the course demonstrated that the skills I employ in cataloging, like considering word choices and translating visual information into text, can be helpful to students in evaluating and talking about art. In planning the class, I also reconsidered the convention of a guest lecture being an uncompensated “honor.” Finally, it proved that making connections with the art community can have significant personal and professional impacts that can be paid forward.


Speaker: Meredith Hale

Creative Collaboration in the Time of COVID: Flipping the Art Library Classroom

This presentation will review active learning strategies and feminist pedagogy in an online setting by providing a case study of a flipped instruction model for a large introductory course in Contemporary Art. As a subject liaison to four departments, it became clear when instruction shifted to the online space that engaging with students in the “classroom” would depend on active collaboration with faculty members. Using a combination of asynchronous instruction, breakout rooms, and synchronous research support, the librarian and faculty member in this instance were able to address research concerns and anxiety throughout the semester rather than in a single one-shot session. This presentation will reveal how the current COVID-driven virtual environment has given us an opportunity to consider how to tackle future one-shot sessions as a more deeply engaged exercise.

Speaker: Courtney Hunt


Remote Control: Innovative Instruction in a Virtual Space

When the physical library spaces were shuttered, the shift to virtual services provided an unexpected opportunity for cross-library collaboration. With the creation of a new virtual orientation a reference librarian partnered with a bibliographer to co-present. This joint effort allowed a chance for participants to learn about recent additions to the collection and introduced researchers to traditionally less public-facing librarian roles. Reference Librarian Annalise Welte and Bibliographer Simone Fujita, enthusiastic library ambassadors, worked together to create a collaborative and creative approach to the intern orientation session. The new format provided an opportunity to candidly address topics not previously included in the session, such as efforts to diversify the library collection, in an approachable manner with pop cultural references woven into the dynamic session.

Speakers: Simone Fujita and Annalise Welte


Strategies for Creating and Maintaining Effective Library Video Tutorials

COVID-19 has dramatically changed the ways in which art librarians reach their patrons, and audiovisual aids have become critical tools as research activities have moved largely online. Many librarians have needed to quickly develop yet another new skillset: video editing. This presentation will take a practical look at developing video tutorials for different audiences and contexts. Attendees will learn how to use design thinking principles to create videos that suit unique use cases and allow for easy reuse and updating in the future. A case will be made that a little forethought and planning, as well as the judicious use of techniques such as callouts and subtitles, can go a long way in bringing utility, accessibility, and clarity to video tutorials.

Speaker: David Greene

Moderators
MT

Marsha Taichman

Visual Resources and Public Services Librarian, Cornell University Library

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Hale

Meredith Hale

Metadata Librarian, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
avatar for Courtney Hunt

Courtney Hunt

Art & Design Librarian and Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University Libraries
Courtney Hunt is the Art & Design Librarian at The Ohio State University. She is interested in art librarianship, #critlib, working towards intersectional feminism, and women artists from the early twentieth century.
avatar for Annalise Welte

Annalise Welte

Reference Librarian, Getty Research Institute
avatar for Simone Fujita

Simone Fujita

Bibliographer, African American Art, Getty Research Institute
avatar for David Greene

David Greene

Liaison Librarian, McGill University
Art History // Communication Studies // Architecture // Urban Planning @ McGill University2021 President, ARLIS/NA-Montreal-Ottawa-QuebecLooking forward to meeting you!


Tuesday May 11, 2021 2:00pm - 3:20pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

06. Sound, Sight & Students: Strategies for Success in Supporting Research, Connections & Access within the Academic Arts
From video tapes and vinyl, to research guides and collaborations with students, our speakers are here to share their discoveries, trials, and triumphs of engaging with sound art, video art, and undergraduate research in film history at the University of Toronto. In Sound, Sight & Students, attendees will join Margaret English to consider the placement of a critical mass of documentation and recordings related to Sound Art in the academic environment of an Art History Library; venture into the grey areas of copyright in a discussion of video art and radical pirate poets with Michelle Johnson; and learn from Kate Johnson's path as a solo librarian building in-roads to best support primary source research through collaborations with the U of T Cinema Studies Student Union and campus partners.

Moderator: Tre Berney


Gathering Sounds: A Case Study of the Interdisciplinary Cultural Study of Sonic Environments

This presentation will discuss the development of the "Sound "Art" Collection at the University of Toronto's Department of Art History Library. Now consisting of a critical mass of exhibitions catalogues, monographs and recordings, this collection is a field trip destination for classes from other Universities and Institutes studying Sound Art, Soundscapes and Sound Studies. Recently, this collection has become an integral resource for a the "Soundscape Studies at the University of Toronto" working group at the Jackman Humanities Institute. This interdisciplinary study network consists of Faculty, a librarian (the presenter), PhD and MA students, undergraduates, curators, and guest speakers. Additional initiatives to promote the collection be discussed.

Speaker: Margaret English

Video Unavailable: The Complexities of Accessing Video Art Online

Video, a revolutionary technology, was commercially introduced in the 1960s and inspired a generation of artists to experiment with this instantaneous moving image based medium. From the abstract electronic formations of Nam June Paik, the cooking show spoofs of Martha Rosler, and the guerilla television of… well… Guerilla Television, the influence of video art cannot be underestimated. Video Art made the late 20th Century created waves in visual culture that we still feel today, influencing movies, music videos and even Sesame Street! In the digital age, it is easy to assume one can simply watch a work of video art on an institution's website, yet, accessing videos outside of a museum's white walls can be a challenge. An art student is more likely to find Rosler’s "Semiotics of the Kitchen" illegally uploaded to platforms like YouTube or Vimeo than available on the MoMA’s website.

This presentation seeks to examine the barriers limiting access to early video art online and offer practical solutions and suggestions to aide librarians, instructors and students in the search for digital video art resources. With higher education taking place completely online due to COVID-19, understanding the medium and utilizing remote resources has never been more necessary. However, video tape is an essentially obsolete technology – a fact that dramatically slows down digitization efforts. Furthermore, in support of artist’s rights, video art is often controlled by third party distributors; while distributors are crucial champions of the medium, issues of copyright complicate discussions of online access. Opportunistic art lovers have taken matters into their own hands, uploading work to online platforms; the most interesting of which is UbuWeb, a volunteer-based repository for obscure art started by a New York poet in 1996 and going strong to this day. By the end of this presentation, attendees should possess a better understanding of video recording technology, the historical development and dissemination of video art, and the problematic nature of many online resources providing access to these works.

Speaker: Michelle Johnson

Proactive Partnerships to Enhance Undergraduate Research Experience in Cinema Studies

Learn about a solo librarian’s path to developing partnerships with Cinema Studies Student Union, Writing Centre, and Student Life Services to enhance undergraduate students’ engagement with primary source research in Film History. Walk away with low cost, practical ideas for jump starting your library's information literacy offerings through collaborations with students and academic colleagues. Take-away ideas will include a variety of events and specific activities your library could facilitate with in-person and online adaptations!

Speaker: Kate Johnson




Moderators
TB

Tre Berney

Director, Digitization and Conservation, Cornell University Library

Speakers
ME

Margaret English

Librarian, University of Toronto
MJ

Michelle Johnson

University of Toronto
KJ

Kate Johnson

Cinema Studies & College Librarian, University of Toronto


Tuesday May 11, 2021 2:00pm - 3:20pm EDT

3:30pm EDT

07. Listening to Architecture: Understanding Recent Designs for Libraries Real and Imagined
Recent library designs can help us interpret and improve the function of the library experience. The design process necessitates that architects and architecture students think creatively and critically. What can we learn from built and unbuilt library designs? The analysis of three recent areas of scholarship helps consolidate the discussion: libraries as “social infrastructure,” architectural aspects of embodied cognition, and the little-explored psychological research on curiosity. These thoughts will be illustrated with recent projects by major firms, emphasizing the 2019 Charles Library at Temple University by Snøhetta. Focusing on unbuilt libraries, a study of Master of Architecture thesis projects presents design and program trends in architectural education and the imagination of emerging architects. Lessons in resilience from these projects help inspire libraries in the future to be elastic spaces that can adapt quickly to challenging situations.

Moderator: Mar González Palacios

Curiosity and Design for Academic Libraries

The literature on library architecture is bifurcated: designers have often emphasized form and librarians function. As the design specialists in our academic libraries, art librarians can mediate, advocating for the value of good design in library facilities planning. Three recent areas of scholarship might help consolidate these discussions: the literature on libraries as “social infrastructure,” another on the architectural aspects of embodied cognition, and the little-explored psychological research on curiosity. Writings on social infrastructure can help us understand the current reallocation of space from collections to people. Embodied cognition provides scientific support for the important subliminal impacts of design. The psychology of curiosity explains some library buildings that seem capable of stimulating inquiry and exploration. These thoughts will be illustrated with recent projects by major firms, emphasizing the 2019 Charles Library at Temple University by Snøhetta.

Speaker: Henry Pisciotta

Exploring Resilient Library Design: A Study of Master of Architecture Thesis Projects

This paper presentation builds on an article that will be published in the Fall of 2021 issue of Art Documentation that analyzes library design through the lens of graduating architecture students between 2015 and 2019. The study of Master of Architecture thesis projects identifies educational trends in the design and program of libraries. Furthermore, looking at unbuilt library designs lays the foundation to collaborate with architecture students and emerging architects in order to create innovative spaces and effect positive change in libraries. The presentation will highlight an analysis of architectural case studies that were researched in the thesis development stage offering insight on influential built library designs. Nest, the resilience of design and program trends in the thesis projects will be discussed. They will be measured in their elasticity and capacity to adapt quickly to challenging situations.

Speaker: Cathryn Copper


Moderators
avatar for Mar González Palacios

Mar González Palacios

Associate Director, Arts Library Special Collections, Robert B. Haas Arts Library, Yale University

Speakers
avatar for Henry Pisciotta

Henry Pisciotta

Arts and Architecture Librarian, Pennsylvania State University
Talking in session 7 - Listening to Architecture. Looking for written criteria / guidelines/ rules for displaying student works in libraries. Interested in most things. Unfortunately.
CC

Cathryn Copper

Virginia Tech



Tuesday May 11, 2021 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT

3:30pm EDT

08. No Refunds: Managing Gifts and Navigating Donors in Museums and Special Collections
Whether due to downsizing baby boomers, or what many media outlets are calling the “Marie Kondo Effect,” libraries and cultural institutions have seen a swell in gift offers in recent years. Managing gifts and navigating relationships with donors, donor families, and the communities your library serves can be complex and challenging. In this session, panelists will discuss the topic of donor relations, policies and procedures in academic libraries. Topics covered will include: standardization and restriction of institutional policies on collections and gifts, managing unsolicited and even unwanted donations, the cost of donations in labor and space, inheriting legacy donors from predecessors, establishing workflows for handling duplicate materials. We hope attendees will learn from our experiences and insights and take away specific examples they can incorporate into their gift management and donor relations policies.


Moderators
CM

Caitlin McGurk

Associate Curator, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Speakers
avatar for John Burns

John Burns

Electronic Resources Librarian, Dixie State University Library
avatar for Malia Van Heukelem

Malia Van Heukelem

Art Archivist Librarian, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library
Malia oversees the Jean Charlot Collection, a large collection of artist papers, plus the Archive of Hawaii Artists & Architects at Hamilton Library. Previously, she worked in the Library's Preservation Department, and has served as Collections Manager for the state's Art in Public... Read More →


Tuesday May 11, 2021 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT

3:30pm EDT

09. Re-Imagining Interactivity, Publishing, and Collaboration as Catalysts for Creativity, Engagement, and Inquiry
Creating space for rethinking existing collaborative models and points of engagement within libraries and archives offers possibilities for everyone involved to learn and grow. Libraries can be an important driver of cross-disciplinary approaches to learning and this session will focus on expanding the ways librarians approach collaboration and teaching to encourage student growth and experimentation. The perspectives and projects are varied, which reflects the same spirit of exploration they seek to inspire. Examining models of publishing, such as those developed and employed by visual artists and visual arts theorists; rethinking how independent study can empower students as co-designers in their coursework; and using digital humanities tools and methods to encourage creative production, experimentation, and further research will provide the foundation of discussion. We will present imaginative approaches to project development, along with practical steps to implement outreach that leads to more expansive thinking about what is possible in undergraduate education.   

Moderator: Jenna Dufour

Not Another Internship: Developing an Independent Study in Librarianship for Undergraduate Art History Students

This paper is presented as a case study of a semester-long course created by the Fine and Performing Arts Librarian in collaboration with an undergraduate art history student and with oversight from Art Historians at a Hispanic serving, public, state university in the Spring of 2020. Presenters will discuss the origination of the collaboration, the course design, and learning outcomes. They will share how the independent study differs from most intern experiences because of its structure as a credit bearing course and the commitment required from the librarian to provide a valuable educational experience. They will also introduce the ways in which library professionals can partner with Art History faculty to introduce undergraduate students to the field of art librarianship and provide opportunities for students to develop important networking and collaboration skills.

Speakers: Anna Harper and Brianna Morales

Publishing as Concept: An Examination of Artist Publishing Practices and Their Value to Undergraduate Library Publishing Programs

This presentation explores the value of introducing publishing practices and strategies developed by artists and theorists into a curriculum designed for an emerging library undergraduate publishing program. While traditional undergraduate research can be nurtured and developed by traditional models of scholarly communication, such as academic journals, what of undergraduate interest in modes of production that fall outside or wish to interrogate more conventional scholarly communication parameters? Sharing with students some of the extended and varied discourse of artistic publishing production and critique allows for the consideration and inclusion of additional perspectives on the process and practice of publishing and has the potential to expand the reach of and interest in undergraduate publishing initiatives, both in terms of student participation and campus partnerships.

THIS PRESENTATION WILL NOT BE RECORDED

Speaker: Dana Ospina

Curators and Active Participants: Archives, Exhibits, Engagement, and Outreach through Teaching

This presentation focuses on how a set of digital humanities workshops offered to university faculty helped them incorporate new resources and methods into their teaching. The first workshop was an overview of digital tools that focused on getting started without feeling overwhelmed, ways to incorporate art and archival resources into projects, and approaches to facilitating meaningful experiences in the classroom. The second workshop refined this material by focusing on how the same idea and content could be used to create three different digital humanities projects—a collection database and map, an online exhibit, and a digital publication. The exhibitions and digital publications created for use in teaching this workshop, along with subsequent student projects, in turn became resources for additional outreach beyond the university setting. Specific strategies for planning and delivering these online workshops will be covered, including next steps that led to collaborations and additional faculty and student engagement.

Speaker: Rebecca Fitzsimmons

Moderators
JD

Jenna Dufour

Research Librarian for Visual Arts, University of California, Irvine

Speakers
avatar for Anna Clare Harper

Anna Clare Harper

Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, University Library, California State University, Sacramento
BM

Brianna Morales

Art History Student, California State University Sacramento, Sacramento
avatar for Dana Ospina

Dana Ospina

Digital Initiatives Librarian, California State University, Dominguez Hills
RF

Rebecca Fitzsimmons

Special Collections, Milner Library, Illinois State University


Tuesday May 11, 2021 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT

4:45pm EDT

Convocation: Awards Ceremony & Distinguished Service Award
Please join us in celebrating ARLIS/NA award winners at the Convocation and Awards Ceremony. We'll be honoring outstanding members with the newly established ARLIS/NA Applauds award as well as the long-standing Distinguished Service Award and recognizing students with the Gerd Muehsam Award and the Wolfgang M. Freitag Internship Award. The Melva J. Dwyer Award and the George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award will celebrate achievements in art publishing. Also being celebrated are the awardees of the Howard Karno Conference Attendance Award, the ARLIS/NA Conference Attendance Award, the ARLIS/NA Student Conference Attendance Award, and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation Virtual Conference Attendance Award for International Exchange.

Moderators
SR

Suzanne Rackover

University Librarian, Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Tuesday May 11, 2021 4:45pm - 5:30pm EDT

5:40pm EDT

Welcome Party
Join us for a virtual reception - a chance to mingle with your ARLIS colleagues to catch up - or meet new colleagues.

Moderators
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President

Tuesday May 11, 2021 5:40pm - 6:30pm EDT
 
Wednesday, May 12
 

9:00am EDT

Morning Yoga
Join Deborah Ultan for rejuvenating morning yoga. At your desk or on your yoga mat at home, start your conference day grounded, centered, and alert.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Ultan

Deborah Ultan

Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries


Wednesday May 12, 2021 9:00am - 9:45am EDT

9:00am EDT

Exhibit Hall Open
The Exhibit Hall is open throughout the conference and provides opportunities to network with conference vendors through open chat, news/activity feeds, one-on-one conversations or video calls, and with video demo rooms.

Wednesday May 12, 2021 9:00am - 4:00pm EDT

10:00am EDT

10. The Cataloging Manual Reinvented: The New RDA Toolkit and the 3R Project
RDA and the RDA Toolkit have undergone a substantial revision known as the 3R project (RDA Toolkit Restructure and Redesign). This revision impacts how catalogers will apply RDA and significantly alters how they access content and instructions in the RDA Toolkit. Members of the ARLIS/NA Cataloging Advisory Committee will give a general overview of the changes to RDA and the major conceptual and functional changes made to the Toolkit with a focus on the needs of art catalogers. Panelists will also present on the CAC’s efforts to propose changes to RDA, on the potential creation of an RDA Toolkit application profile for cataloging art material, and the committee’s ongoing revision of the “Cataloging exhibition publications: best practice” document (published by ARLIS/NA in 2010) to comply with RDA standards. There will be time allotted for questions.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Andrea Puccio

Andrea Puccio

Collections Management Librarian, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute
avatar for Sherman Clarke

Sherman Clarke

Retired from NYU Libraries and working part-time at Scholes Library of Ceramics at the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University and as a contract indexer for the Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals. Founding coordinator of the Art NACO funnel of the Program for... Read More →
avatar for Alexandra Provo

Alexandra Provo

Metadata Librarian, New York University
avatar for Karen Stafford

Karen Stafford

Associate Director, Art Institute of Chicago


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

11. Creativity and Collaborations in Special Collections and Archives / Créativité et collaborations dans les archives et collections spéciales
This bilingual session explores the ways in which archives and special collections engage with their communities by using their visual and textual resources as tools for teaching and learning. Various modes of activation are explored in each of these papers as they demonstrate how collection materials are mediated to reveal new understandings of issues in science, art and design by engaging in collaborative pedagogical activities. 

Cette séance bilingue explore les façons dont les archives et les collections spéciales interagissent avec leurs communautés en utilisant leurs ressources visuelles et textuelles comme outils d’enseignement et d’apprentissage. Divers modes d’activation des collections sont explorés dans chacune des présentations. Elles feront la lumière sur la façon dont les documents sont contextualisés pour révéler de nouvelles perspectives sur des enjeux liés aux sciences, à l’art et au design en offrant des activités pédagogiques collaboratives.

Moderator: Jessica Hébert


Reimagining the Special Collections Classroom: Creating an Active Learning Laboratory

This paper will discuss the creation of an active learning laboratory for art and design students in special collections and archives. With this method of teaching with rare materials, exposure is still facilitated, but students are given broad leeway to investigate and interpret these materials on their own. Before the workshop, students view short videos or presentations on the topic and answer questions through an online tutorial. During the session, with guiding questions from librarians that ask them to look deeply and develop their visual literacy skills, students actively interpret the artifacts. During the “gallery walk,” students introduce their classmates to the materials they have investigated. This process of student-led engagement and discussion reimagines the special collections classroom as an active learning laboratory that proves rewarding for students and faculty.

Speakers: Kasia Leouis and Greg Schmidt

Les observatoires scientifiques comme lieux de convergence à l'ère des changements climatiques : ressources scientifiques et visuelles aux Archives des jésuites du Canada

Reconnaissant l’importance des connaissances scientifiques dans une période de changements climatiques, les Archives des jésuites au Canada (AJC) préparent un projet d’exposition sur les observatoires jésuites du 20e siècle à partir des ressources scientifiques et visuelles dans ses fonds. Les matériaux graphiques et photographiques sélectionnés éclairent la recherche et les démarches scientifiques. Cette communication souligne que la narration visuelle de ces recherches, mises en lumière dans l’exposition, se veut comme un lieu de convergence entre l’art, la science et les ressources documentaires. Le projet témoigne par ailleurs de l’importance des ressources scientifiques visuelles et graphiques se trouvant dans les bibliothèques et les centres d’archives, et montre ainsi leur rôle dans les questions contemporaines reliées aux changements climatiques. Cette communication fait part d’une approche créative et pédagogique afin de stimuler l’engagement des AJC envers différents publics.

As a result of the importance of scientific knowledge in a time of climate change, The Archives of the Jesuits in Canada (AJC) are preparing an exhibit project on 20th century Jesuit observatories based on scientific and visual resources from its fonds. The selected resources – both graphic and photographic – provide insight on scientific approaches and research. This presentation sheds light on how visual research, highlighted in the exhibit, can reflect a convergence of artistic, scientific, and documentary resources. The project demonstrates the importance of visual and graphic scientific resources found in libraries and archives, as well as their role in contemporary climate change issues. This presentation is part of a creative and pedagogical approach to develop the AJC’s audience.

Speaker: Dominique Robb

Paper Play: Engaging Students with Artists' Books / L’engagement des étudiants avec des livres d’artistes

Starting with a student curated exhibition on artist's books titled Paper Play, this session will examine how students can be brought into the collaborative work of Special Collections through teaching, curating, and making artists' books. The Italian designer and artist Bruno Munari encouraged readers to interact with his books by engaging multiple senses: to open treasure boxes or windows, peer through holes, and turn translucent and crinkly pages, for example. This focus on interactivity and engaging the multiple senses of a reader remains a prominent feature of many contemporary artists' books today. Interactive by nature, artists' books provide numerous opportunities for meaningful, multi-layered engagement and offer students and librarians a path for intellectual and creative exploration.

À travers une présentation de l’exposition “Paper Play” sur les livres d’artistes organisée par des étudiants, cette intervention examinera comment les étudiants peuvent participer dans un travail collaboratif avec des collections spéciales en enseignant, en organisant, et en créant des livres d’artistes. Le créateur et artiste italien Bruno Munari encourageait ses lecteurs à s’engager avec ses livres en faisant appel à leurs sens multiples: ouvrir des boîtes à trésors ou des fenêtres, regarder à travers des ouvertures, ou tourner des pages translucides et froissées. L’interactivité et l’utilisation des multiples sens du lecteur sont aujourd’hui une caractéristique importante de nombreux livres d’artistes contemporains. Interactifs par nature, les livres d’artistes offrent de nombreuses possibilités d’engagement significatif et multidimensionnel en offrant aux étudiants et aux bibliothécaires une voie d’exploration à la fois intellectuelle et créatif.

Speakers: Clara Drummond and Maggie Welch

Moderators
avatar for Jessica Hébert

Jessica Hébert

Librarian, Print Collection Specialist, Artexte

Speakers
avatar for Kasia Leousis

Kasia Leousis

Head, Library of Architecture, Design and Construction, Auburn University
GS

Greg Schmidt

Auburn University
DR

Dominique Robb

Archives des jésuites au Canada
avatar for Clara Drummond

Clara Drummond

Curator & Exhibitions Coordinator, Penn State University
MW

Maggie Welch

Former Stelts-Filippelli Curatorial Intern, Penn State University, now Austin TX


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

12. Exploring Provenance: Research Methodology and Digital Discoverability
This session will address aspects of provenance research on cultural property from different angles. The first presentation will detail research methods and findings on displaced monographs within Canadian cultural institutions, while the second presentation will provide an overview of an undertaking at the Getty Research Institute to increase access to digitized art auction catalogs. Themes of the session will include examining the availability of primary and secondary sources for provenance research, creative collaborations with librarians, archivists, and researchers both within and across institutions, as well as the challenges of reconciling dispersed physical materials and varying metadata on digital surrogates. In exploring the process of enhancing access to primary art history sources and through an exemplar of tracing the history of looted books, the session aims to inform and support research into the provenance of cultural objects.

Moderator: Sally McKay

Nazi Looted Cultural Property in Canadian Educational Institutions

This presentation will provide current research on the occurrence of World War II displaced (Nazi looted) artwork and books in Canadian museums, art galleries, academic libraries and archives through collaboration with key scholars and institutions such as the World Jewish Restitution Organization and the Alex Dworkin Canadian Jewish Archives. This research, initiated during COVID, included locating seminal archival files, documents such as the "Holocaust-Era Judaica and Jewish Cultural Property: A World-Wide Review" and analyzing Canada's best practice guidelines for "Holocaust-era Provenance Research in Art Museums and Galleries." Through examining historical information, library/artefact databases and contacting Judaica librarians and archivists in Canadian cultural institutions, this research will provide recommendations for conducting provenance research of specialized or displaced collections in general.

Speaker: Karen Halliday

Cross-Departmental Collaboration: Enhancing Research Capabilities on Art Auction Catalogs

This joint presentation will illustrate a recent collaboration between two long term projects, the Getty Provenance Index and the Getty Research Portal, which involved aligning these previously separate platforms at our institution in order to better support provenance research. The GPI provides transcriptions of the contents of documents related to the history of art, including rare annotated copies of auction catalogs, and enhances these by providing authority control for artist, buyer, and seller names. The Portal is a free online search platform that provides access to digitized texts on art, architecture, material culture, and related fields—including several thousand auction catalogs. This presentation will detail how the collaboration sought to correlate digitized auction catalogs available through the Portal with entries in the GPI. In the current environment where access to libraries and archives has been significantly reduced due to the pandemic, availability of such digital surrogates has taken on renewed importance.

Speakers: Annie Rana and Eric Hormell


Moderators
SM

Sally McKay

Head, Research Services, Getty Research Institute

Speakers
avatar for Karen Halliday

Karen Halliday

Faculty Librarian, Georgian College
AR

Annie Rana

Project Manager, Getty Research Institute
EH

Eric Hormell

Getty Research Institute


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

Posters On View
The 49th Annual ARLIS/NA conference showcases a wide range of thought-provoking posters highlighting innovative research by colleagues in the art information community. Posters can be viewed at any time throughout the conference. You are welcome to start a conversation with the poster exhibitors through direct messaging, comments, one-on-one video calls. Come back on Thursday May 13 for the Poster Finisssage at 2:30 PM when all poster exhibitors will be on hand for live Q&A.

LIST OF POSTERS AND PRESENTERS

Mapping a Transcendent Life: Using ArcGIS Storymaps to Showcase the Public Art, Monuments, and Murals of Muhammad Ali
Courtney Baron, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville

A Visual History of Quebec's CEGEP Libraries and Other Religious and Civic Building Conversions
Susan Bissonnette, Librarian for Information Sciences, Vanier College (CEGEP)

The Francis Bedford Archive: Nineteenth-Century Architectural Photography in England and Wales
Claralyn Burt, Digital Collections Specialist, Gonzaga University

The Sistine Chapel and the Panama Canal: Energy and Memory in Handmade Artists’ Books
Amanda Clark, Library Director, Whitworth University

The Information Literacy Course in Canadian MFA Programs
Sandra Cowan, Fine Arts Librarian, University of Lethbridge
Marissa Rocca, Student Learning and Engagement Librarian, Grande Prairie College

Every Subject Heading on 100 West Hastings St.
Ana Diab, Collections, Reference + Instruction Librarian, Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Assessing the Impact of Covid-19 on the Use of Art Print and Ebooks at an Academic Library
Mary Anne Dyer, Metadata Catalog Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
Emily Davis Winthrop, Art Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University

Pivoting in a Pandemic: Exploring the Art Book and Building Community in a Virtual Speaker Series
Jessica Evans Brady, Research & Collections Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
Shalimar Fojas White, Herman and Joan Suit Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

If You Can Write, You Can Draw! How I Reconnected with My Love of Drawing During the Pandemic
Jacqueline Fleming, Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian, Indiana University-Bloomington

Creating Accessible Academic Information for All with Wikipedia Editing in Undergraduate Art History Courses
Anna Harper, Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, California State University, Sacramento
Rachel Miller, Art History, California State University, Sacramento
Channing Corbin, B.A. Art History, Student, California State University, Sacramento

Job Sharing during Times of Crisis
Yuki Hibben, Interim Head of Special Collections and Archives & Curator of Books and Art, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

A Call for Connection and Collaboration in Information Literacy Instruction for Studio Arts
Ashley Huot, MLIS candidate at the University of Alberta with a background in studio arts, art education, and community development, University of Alberta (MLIS candidate)

Leveraging Research and Information Management (RIM) Systems in Support of Art and Architecture Faculty
Megan Macken, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Liaison to Art, Art History & Graphic Design, Oklahoma State University

The Kress Digital Archive: Collaboration, Context, and Connections
Shannon Morelli, Archivist, National Gallery of Art

Scan This to See a Cat: A Pilot for Digital Image Collections Outreach around Campus
Maggie Murphy, Visual Art & Humanities Librarian, UNC Greensboro
Brown Biggers, IT Operations Manager, UNC Greensboro

“Could We Work with the Library on This?”: Strategies for Increasing Departmental Engagement as a New Art Liaison Librarian
Claire Payne, Web Services and Data Librarian and Liaison to the Department of Art, Stony Brook University Libraries

Fresh Faces, Sticky Fingers: Public Programming at the Walker Art Center Library
Jennifer Riestenberg, Assistant Librarian, Walker Art Center

Virtual Teaching Collections on the Getty Research Portal: Digital Access Across Institutions
Megan Sallabedra, Research Associate, Getty Research Institute

Converging Fields: Connecting Creative Students to Information Literacy through Art and Design Pedagogies
Virginia Seymour, Research and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design

New Approaches to Embedded Librarianship with Interior Design during the Time of COVID-19
Leah Sherman, Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University

Roadblocks to Assessing Arts Collections for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion
Madison Sullivan, Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Washington

Changing the Arts Canon Through Curated BIPOC Research Guides
Aubree Tillett, Arts & Design Librarian Intern, University of Minnesota Libraries
Deborah Ultan, Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries

Welcome to the Black Art Library
Asmaa Walton, Founder, Black Art Library

Scaffolding Business Research Design Instruction for Art and Design Students
Andrew Wang, Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Oregon

Finding Our Way: Improving Discoverability of Native American and Indigenous Materials
Alice Whiteside, Head, Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Monica Figueroa, Interim Librarian for Inclusive Excellence, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Interpreting Desires: The Experiences of Artists in Archives
Lulu Zilinskas, Recent MLIS graduate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 5:00pm EDT

11:10am EDT

13. Mission Critical: Fundraising Skills in Usual and Not-So-Usual Times
Regardless of research setting, it has become vital for art information professionals to pursue financial support through individual donors, friends groups, community partners, and grant-funding entities in order to advance our institutional missions and goals. Unfortunately, relatively few art information professionals have backgrounds in institutional advancement, grant writing or donor relations. The challenging financial environment brought on by the pandemic has further underscored the necessity for these skills.

This session will highlight key aspects of fundraising through the insights of three proven leaders, each of whom will address tried and true approaches to fundraising. They will also share reflections about their fundraising experiences during the pandemic that relate to capital projects, exhibitions, and virtual fundraisers, as well as diversity and equity initiatives.

Moderators
avatar for Jon Evans

Jon Evans

Chief of Libraries and Archives, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Speakers
SL

Sandra Ludig Brooke

Avery Director of the Library, Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens
avatar for Milan Hughston

Milan Hughston

Retired, former Chief of Library, Museum of Modern Art
avatar for Ann Whiteside

Ann Whiteside

Librarian and Assistant Dean for Information Services, Harvard University Graduate School of Design
Digital Collections and teaching


Wednesday May 12, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

11:10am EDT

14. Publications for the People! Archives, Workshops, and Engaging the Audience
The act of creating zines is inherently community based--they’re meant to be given away, swapped, and maybe even lost in a pile of books. Zines have also become a part of library and archive culture, whether through preservation efforts or class instruction. Presenters on this panel will discuss their experiences with zines in the classroom, the library, and the archive while addressing the challenges these unique materials present.

Eve Griffin examines the history of teenage girls and their creative output in 1990s America, as influenced by feminist activist and music culture.

Shira Loev Eller describes a do-it-yourself zine workshop for students that created community through art-making, engaged students with special collections materials, and provided an opportunity to learn about counterculture history.

Stefanie Hilles and Alia Levar Wegner discuss the creation of a zine archive serving the needs of both student and faculty users that would be both used by and created during zine workshops.

Moderator: Steenz

What Can Feminist Punk Rock Teach Us About the Collecting and Evaluation of Ephemera?

The Riot Grrrl Collection (RGC) at NYU’s Fales Library represents a sustained and dynamic effort to collect rebellion-oriented ephemera from the early 90s feminist-punk movement. The Riot Grrrls, a loose feminist collective that thrived on punk aesthetic and grassroots activism, fought to raise consciousness about, provide political commentary on, and resist and educate against racism, rape, domestic violence, homophobia and heterosexism, classism, reproductive rights, and equity. They called for a teen girl revolution that emphasized the importance of making rather than consuming. As a result, thousands of zines (DIY magazines), buttons, flyers, posters, cassettes, photographs, media clippings, and notebooks were generated by teen girls throughout the country, and comprise the basis of the Fales’ collections. With an emphasis on self-made materials, these items stand in stark contrast to an archives’ more rare and valuable items, yet they offer an unparalleled understanding of feminism, punk activism, DIY culture, and rebellion in the early 1990s. Now containing over 30 discrete collections, the Fales Library holdings represent a different understanding of ephemera as it relates to historic narrative, offering a rare glimpse of teenage girl vernacular, as well as a new perspective on activist culture and rebellion.

Speaker: Eve Griffin

Soviet Counterculture, Poison Girls, and Glue Sticks: Engaging History and Enhancing Community with a Do-It-Yourself Zine Workshop

The feeling of community and camaraderie is essential to first year student success and retention; urban universities with dispersed campus locations can particularly struggle to meet this need for our students. As central gathering places which exist outside the formal academic structure, libraries can serve as a locale for informal, community-building activities. In this presentation, I will discuss how I, as Art and Design Librarian, collaborated with library partners to co-lead a do-it-yourself zine workshop which was not only successful at creating community through art-making, but engaged special collections materials and provided an informal opportunity to learn about counterculture history.

Speaker: Shira Loev Eller

The Revolution Will Be Archived: Creating a Student-Centered Zine Collection for Instruction

Once the purview of underground counterculture, zines are now actively collected in archives and libraries for both preservation and access. This presentation discusses the collaboration between the Arts and Humanities Librarian and the Digital Collections Librarian to create a new zine archive at a university art library specifically aimed to serve the teaching needs of its student and faculty users. The project team used ArchivesSpace, the university’s archival management system, to archive the collection and improve the discoverability of the materials. By focusing on accessibility, while still meeting preservation standards, the project team seeks to reimagine the archive as a student-centered teaching collection that will be used during the art librarian’s popular zine instruction sessions.

Speakers: Stefanie Hilles and Alia Levar Wegner

Moderators
S

Steenz

Freelance Cartoonist, Editor, and Cartooning Professor

Speakers
avatar for Eve Griffin

Eve Griffin

Curator of Fine Arts, Boston Public Library
Special collections, archives, museum collections, registrar, collections management, public art
avatar for Shira Loev Eller

Shira Loev Eller

Art and Design Librarian, George Washington University
Talk to me about artists' books, art and design students, collection development, library instruction, liaison work, and art librarianship in an academic library.
SH

Stefanie Hilles

Arts & Humanities Librarian, Wertz Art and Architecture Library, Miami University
Stefanie Hilles is the Arts and Humanities Librarian at Wertz Art and Architecture Library at Miami University, where she liaisons to the art, architecture, and theater departments, manages their collections, and instructs information literacy sessions. She also curates exhibitions... Read More →
AL

Alia Levar Wegner

Digital Collections Librarian, Walter Havighurst Special Collections and University Archives


Wednesday May 12, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

11:10am EDT

15. Creativity at Work: Teaching in the New Virtual Environment
COVID-19 has presented a multitude of challenges for librarians, forcing us to completely rethink what it means to thoughtfully engage with our library users. This extends to the library classroom, which shifted dramatically for many when campuses around the country closed down and went virtual this past spring. This panel will highlight the experiences of teacher librarians who navigated the new virtual environment, as they share their thoughts, best practices, and lessons learned. Panelists will specifically address: working with non-art majors in the virtual classroom; shifting to a fully remote instructional delivery method due to COVID-19 without subscription services; engaging in mental flexibility through collaboration; and teaching with special collections in a remote model.

Moderators
AB

Anna Boutin-Cooper

Research & Visual Arts Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College
avatar for Eva Sclippa

Eva Sclippa

First Year Engagement Librarian, UNC Wilmington
Teaching SIG Co-Coordinator

Speakers
TD

Tonya D. Lee

Instructional Technology & Online Learning Coordinator, Moore College of Art & Design
avatar for Barbara Prior

Barbara Prior

Head, Clarence Ward Art Library, Oberlin College
avatar for Maggie Murphy

Maggie Murphy

Visual Art & Humanities Librarian, UNC Greensboro
avatar for Melody Rood

Melody Rood

Student Success and Open Education Librarian, UNC Greensboro
MH

Maia Hajj

Moore College of Art & Design
MS

Mackenzie Salisbury

School of Art Institute of Chicago


Wednesday May 12, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

12:20pm EDT

Exhibit Hall: Dedicated Exhibit Time
The Exhibit Hall is open throughout the conference and provides opportunities to network with conference vendors through open chat, news/activity feeds, one-on-one conversations or video calls, and with video demo rooms. This dedicated time slot takes place between conference sessions giving attendees a chance to browse or engage with vendors at their leisure.

Wednesday May 12, 2021 12:20pm - 1:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

16. Now Screening: How Films and Video Enhance Documentation of the Decorative Arts
In this media-based session, four panelists will each screen a series of short clips that illustrate how vital film and video footage is for documenting the history of decorative arts. Decorative arts librarians and instructors Beth Goodrich, John Burns, Beth Hylen, and Elizabeth Mowl Lay have selected films and videos from a variety of genres and formats: clips with archival artists-at-work footage from the American Craft Council; PBS's seminal “Craft in America” television series; video-rich e-books by the Corning Museum of Glass on Venetian glassworking; and feature-length commercial films that show how Hollywood films influenced popular fashion. In addition to seeing important examples of artists, craft, decorative arts, and design live on video, attendees will have the opportunity to learn about libraries with strong collections of decorative arts and design on video, and about various producers and sites of preservation for dec arts- related video and film.

Moderators
avatar for Karyn Hinkle

Karyn Hinkle

Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Kentucky

Speakers
avatar for John Burns

John Burns

Electronic Resources Librarian, Dixie State University Library
avatar for Beth Goodrich

Beth Goodrich

Librarian/Archivist, American Craft Council
avatar for Beth Hylen

Beth Hylen

Retired, Corning Museum of Glass
EM

Elizabeth Mowl Lay

Decorative Arts Historian


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

17. Confluent Practices: Non-Traditional Research Methodologies in Art Librarianship
As art information professions evolve, we look to understand our work and patrons through a diversity of voices, experiences, and approaches. Although LIS scholarship reflects a multidisciplinary approach to research, much of the existing literature focuses on traditional qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The turn towards autoethnography, creative interventions to library work, and the utilization of non-traditional information sources enriches our practices and our own body of knowledge. This panel will explore the application of non-traditional research sources and methodologies in art information scholarship. Panelists will discuss new ways of approaching the literature of art librarianship or visual literacy, the application of autoethnography and reflective practices in art information work, creative and studio practice in relation to library work, and other approaches.

Moderator: Mackenzie Salisbury

Reading Outside the Lines: Using the Writings of Artists to Understand Artistic Research Practices

This paper will explore an article for the Spring 2021 issue of Art Documentation. After reviewing the literature related to artists’ information seeking, we sought a study focused broadly on artists’ research practice beyond the context of the library. Rather than limiting our search to the literature written by librarians, we looked to the literature written by artists, for artists to develop a framework for understanding information acquisition in the studio. We found a rich discourse which made many of our implicit knowledge explicit, and both filled in and augmented the library-centric literature. The resulting framework posits that knowledge for studio artists is embodied, affective, ambivalent toward disciplinary norms and strategies, and enacted through making. Rather than surveying art students or faculty, we interviewed two practicing artists to uncover the extent to which their framework was supported. Based on these preliminary findings, we will discuss future directions for this scholarship.

Speakers: Courtney Hunt and Michele Jennings

The Personal is Pedagogical: Autoethnography, Disability Studies and Interdisciplinary Art and Design Education

During a research project on the effects of service work on library workers who experience mental illness, I was introduced to two research methodologies that would intersect with my pedagogical practice: disability studies and autoethnography. At Maryland Institute College of Art, I work directly with Senior Thesis students in a number of departments, meeting with around 85 students for research consultations annually. Many of these students are interested in accessibility and design, or in exploring their own identity through their work. Introducing them to autoethnography and disability studies often radically transformed their experiences of research. Further, I found myself engaging more deeply with students, bringing my own practice and personal experiences into our discussions. In this presentation, I will explore the relationship between the interdisciplinary research strategies I employed in my writing and how these tactics changed my pedagogical practice, enabling me to better support my students’ creative work.

Speaker: Sian Evans

Performing Art History: Scholarship as Embodied Practice

This session proposes a praxis-oriented approach on how embodied art history can activate viewers and spaces through performative and artistic practices that rewrite and discuss art histories beyond the threshold of the academy while maintaining critical academic engagement and rigor. I will illustrate this proposed approach through an exploration of my own mixed artistic and art historical practice: Queer Heresies. My practice is one of socially engaged art and research that combines archival and historical with artmaking to create rituals of mythmaking, cultural subversion and heresy, and the production of new research and perspectives for global and diasporic audiences. By activating art historical research through this creative practice, I argue the gallery, the library, the archive, and the museum carry the possibility of transforming its visitors, by inviting them to imagine worlds, people, and cultures both like and unlike their own.

Speaker: Kevin Talmer Whiteneir Jr.

Comics as Information Behavior Artifacts

Sometimes it has felt like a struggle to get studio art students (and even faculty) to see the benefits of incorporating research into an art practice. My personal and professional love of the medium of comics has shown me what magic can happen when creators clearly have done their research. This has inspired a long-term project of exploring the information behavior of comics creators. This presentation will discuss the first steps of this project that involves attempting to capture comics creator's information behavior through their finished products: comics. I'll also address how this investigation might inform my work as an academic art librarian.

Speaker: Olivia Piepmeier



Moderators
MS

Mackenzie Salisbury

School of Art Institute of Chicago

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Hunt

Courtney Hunt

Art & Design Librarian and Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University Libraries
Courtney Hunt is the Art & Design Librarian at The Ohio State University. She is interested in art librarianship, #critlib, working towards intersectional feminism, and women artists from the early twentieth century.
MJ

Michele Jennings

Ohio University
avatar for Sian Evans

Sian Evans

Information Literacy and Instructional Design Librarian, Maryland Institute College of Art
Siân Evans is the Information Literacy & Instructional Design Librarian at Maryland Institute College of Art and the co-founder of Art+Feminism, a campaign to create meaningful changes to the body of knowledge available about feminism and the arts on Wikipedia. Her writing can be... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Talmer Whiteneir Jr.

Kevin Talmer Whiteneir Jr.

Senior Library Assistant, Ryerson and Burnham Library and Archives, Research Center, The Art Institute of Chicago
Kevin Whiteneir Jr. is an interdisciplinary artist and art historian whose work discusses the relationships between gender and queer experiences as they relate to race, the effects of (neo)colonialism, and its parallels with performance, ritual, religion, and witchcraft. Whiteneir... Read More →
OP

Olivia Piepmeier

Arts & Humanities Librarian, UMass-Dartmouth


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

18. Promoting Artists’ Book Criticism and Scholarship through Collaboration: We All Want the Same Thing (But What Is It?)
Strong, diverse criticism and scholarship are vital for the promotion of the book arts, the creation of new projects, and for making artist books accessible to a wider audience. Artist book criticism does not exist in a vacuum; it is the product of a symbiotic community of book artists, publishers, writers, collectors, enthusiasts, librarians, and scholars. This session will examine three ongoing examples of collaborative efforts aimed at satisfying the multifaceted needs of the diverse book arts community. These include focusing the Contemporary Artist Book Conference (CABC) on these topics, the launch of the Book Art Review initiative with Center for Book Arts (CBA), and the framing of a discovery project with the Bibliographical Society of America. Following short presentations on each of these three initiatives, there will be a discussion among the panelists on the objectives of these endeavors and the central role collaboration plays in achieving them.


Moderators
DD

Deirdre Donohue

Assistant Director, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs, New York Public Library

Speakers
CR

Corina Reynolds

Center for Book Arts
avatar for Giana Ricci

Giana Ricci

Librarian for the Fine Arts, New York University
DS

David Solo

Independent Researcher


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

19. Collaborative Change Management Within College Libraries
Experiencing and navigating change is inevitable in any workplace environment. How change is implemented has a lasting impact on the success of specific initiatives and overall organizational effectiveness. Change as a collaborative process, either between colleagues or administrators and staff, is a strategy to improve organizational effectiveness and implementation of new services, resources, or staff responsibilities. In addition to examining current literature on leadership and change in the workplace, session presenters will share examples of collaborative change through the lens of their home institutions. The presentations provide examples of navigating change through different roles within the library from the perspective of both an administrator and a librarian. Following the presentations, session attendees will be invited to participate in small group discussion to explore strategies for navigating change as based on their home institutions. 


Moderators
EM

Emilee Mathews

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
BP

Becca Pad

Director of Libraries, College for Creative Studies
avatar for Ginny Moran

Ginny Moran

Research & Instruction Librarian, DeWitt Wallace Library, Macalester College
Ginny Moran is a Fine Arts & Humanities Librarian at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. She is a past-chair of the ARLIS/NA-Twin Cities Chapter, past moderator of the ARLIS/NA Academic Library Division, and currently serves as co-chair of the Association for College & Research... Read More →


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

2:45pm EDT

President's Choice Session: Changemakers Conversation: Addressing Systemic Racism, Effecting Change
How do you make strides towards racial equity in GLAMs? Join us for a conversation with changemakers in arts education, museums, and libraries and learn how they are addressing systemic racism and effecting change in their fields.

The “President’s Choice” session is organized and hosted by the ARLIS/NA Anti-Racism Task Force.

Moderators
avatar for Heather Slania

Heather Slania

Director, Heather Slania, ARLIS/NA Education Liaison
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Kostelecky

Sarah Kostelecky

Director Digital Initiatives & Scholarly Communica, University of New Mexico
Sarah R. Kostelecky is an associate professor and the Director of Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communication (DISC) at the University of New Mexico’s College of University Libraries and Learning Sciences She earned her Master’s in Library Science from the University of Arizona... Read More →
avatar for Arthur Affleck, III

Arthur Affleck, III

Executive Vice President, American Alliance of Museums
Arthur G. Affleck, III Executive Vice President, American Alliance of MuseumsWith training in Law and Higher Education, over the years, Arthur has built a record of achievement in education administration, institutional advancement and nonprofit governance. Since coming to the American... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall

Dr. Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall

Dean of Design, Ontario College of Art and Design University
Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall is a design anthropologist, public intellectual, and design advocate who works at the intersections of critical theory, culture, and design. As Dean of Design at Ontario College of Art and Design University, she is the first black and black female dean of... Read More →


Wednesday May 12, 2021 2:45pm - 4:00pm EDT

4:15pm EDT

Diversity Forum: Accessibility in Art Libraries
THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING: updated links below

Join ARLIS/NA Diversity and Inclusion Committee presenters Shannon Finnegan and Cyree Johnson as they explore the issue of accessibility in art libraries. Our presenters are artists and activists who provide workshops on ways libraries can be more inclusive. Shannon will address visual impairments and cognitive disabilities through a reframing of alt-text as a type of poetry and practice. Cyree will examine how libraries think of disabled patrons and colleagues and ways these spaces can embrace all members of the library. The Diversity Forum is hosted by the ARLIS/NA Diversity and Inclusion Committee.

Shannon Finnegan is a multidisciplinary artist making work about accessibility and disability culture. They have done projects with Banff Centre, Friends of the High Line, Tallinn Art Hall, Nook Gallery, and the Wassaic Project. They have spoken about their work at the Brooklyn Museum, School for Poetic Computation, The 8th Floor, and The Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library. In 2018, they received a Wynn Newhouse Award and participated in Art Beyond Sight’s Art + Disability Residency. In 2019, they were an artist-in-residence at Eyebeam. Their work has been written about in C Magazine, Art in America, Hyperallergic, and the New York Times. They live and work in Brooklyn, NY.

Cyree Jarelle Johnson is a writer and librarian from Piscataway, New Jersey. He holds an MSLIS from Drexel University, an MFA from Columbia University, and a BA from Hampshire College. He is the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Librarian at Pratt Institute Libraries. SLINGSHOT, Johnson’s first collection of poetry, was released in 2019 by Nightboat Books. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Rewire News, Boston Review, Vice, and The Root. He has delivered lectures, recited poetry, and facilitated workshops at The White House, Whitney Museum of American Art, Interplanetary Festival, Performance Space NYC, and TEDxColumbia as well as colleges, youth groups, prisons, churches, and community spaces. His work has been supported by grants and scholarships from Leeway Foundation, Astraea's Global Arts Fund, CultureStrike, Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund, and Columbia University.

THIS SESSION WILL NOT BE RECORDED

Resources shared during the session
www.cyreejarellejohnson.com
https://shannonfinnegan.com/
https://www.wellcertified.com/
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-627-m/11-627-m2020086-eng.htm
https://webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker/
https://www.stalled.online/standards
https://alt-text-as-poetry.net/
https://www.tpgi.com/color-contrast-checker/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CHxssdhMTM-/
https://www.grackledocs.com/how-it-works-grackles-slides/
https://www.color-blindness.com/coblis-color-blindness-simulator/
https://designmattersatartcenter.org/proj/reimagining-access-inclusive-technology-design-for-archives-and-special-collections/overview/
http://www.accesstext.org/
https://www.bookshare.org/cms/
https://www.libraryfutures.net/
https://www.librarystack.org/
Brightspace from D2L
The WAVE app, tota11y plug in, and spectrum


Moderators
avatar for Carla-Mae Crookendale

Carla-Mae Crookendale

Arts Research Librarian, Assistant Professor, VCU Libraries, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for K. Sarah Ostrach

K. Sarah Ostrach

Kress Fellow in Art Librarianship, Yale University

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Finnegan

Shannon Finnegan

Multidisciplinary artist
avatar for Cyree Jarelle Johnson

Cyree Jarelle Johnson

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Librarian, Pratt Institute Libraries


Wednesday May 12, 2021 4:15pm - 5:30pm EDT
 
Thursday, May 13
 

9:00am EDT

Morning Yoga
Join Deborah Ultan for rejuvenating morning yoga. At your desk or on your yoga mat at home, start your conference day grounded, centered, and alert.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Ultan

Deborah Ultan

Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries


Thursday May 13, 2021 9:00am - 9:45am EDT

9:00am EDT

Exhibit Hall Open
The Exhibit Hall is open throughout the conference and provides opportunities to network with conference vendors through open chat, news/activity feeds, one-on-one conversations or video calls, and with video demo rooms.

Thursday May 13, 2021 9:00am - 2:00pm EDT

10:00am EDT

20. Joining Forces: Improving Access, Representation and Preservation through Private and Public Collaboration
This presentation will report on the initial findings of a case study that applied crowdsourcing as a methodology for enhanced description of archival photographs through community engagement. It will explore how the collective memory within communities can be harnessed to generate descriptive metadata for image-based collections, thereby enhancing their discovery. The majority of crowdsourcing initiatives developed by libraries and archives are transcription-based projects. In contrast, this project adopted crowdsourcing for the description of image-based resources. By engaging community members to describe archival photographs that relate to their histories, the descriptive information takes on new, deeper dimensions of meaning. In this way, community-driven description can support diversity, equity and inclusion by involving communities in the construction of their own historical narratives. This presentation will review the outcomes of this methodology, describe future applications, and discuss the broader opportunities this methodology offers for community outreach and engagement.

Moderator: Colleen Farry


Inter-Agency Collaboration: Piloting a Visual Resources Consortium to Meet Society of Architectural Historians Preservation Goals through an NEH Grant-Funded Project

This presentation provides an overview of our successful NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Planning Grant award and its related work advancing the Society of Architectural Historians’ Color Film Emergency Project. The grant, which was announced just as the world went into pandemic lockdown, has presented a clash of good news/bad news challenges. The presenters will discuss the grant project origins and how the project is taking shape, as well as obstacles encountered and lessons learned, including their navigation of the University of California’s federal grant policies and processing, and the complications resulting from a sub-award model. They will also discuss piloting the consortium model being developed through the grant project, and the incorporation of recent learning through polling efforts. The presenters hope to gain both feedback and participation interest from ARLIS/NA members.

Speakers: Sonja Sekely-Rowland and Jacqueline Spafford

Building Bridges: Working Together to Disseminate Japanese Art Literature

This joint presentation will address the current collaboration between the Getty Research Institute and the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties to disseminate a selection of recently-digitized texts on Japanese art. Through metadata coordination between our institutions, this literature, which includes Japanese art journals, rare exhibition catalogs on Japanese art, and woodblock print books, has been made available via the Getty Research Portal, a free online search platform that provides access to digitized art history texts contributed by a range of international institutions. With a significant number of these texts not previously available online and functionally inaccessible for many scholars—made all the more so given travel restrictions with the current pandemic—our institutions aimed to make this valuable material readily obtainable in digital form. This presentation will address the collaboration’s history and challenges, explore some of the digitized content, and discuss future potential outcomes.

Speakers: Annie Rana and Tomoko Emura

Capturing the Knowledge of the Crowd: Crowdsourcing Initiatives with Archival Photographic Collections

This presentation will report on the initial findings of a case study that applied crowdsourcing as a methodology for enhanced description of archival photographs through community engagement. It will explore how the collective memory within communities can be harnessed to generate descriptive metadata for image-based collections, thereby enhancing their discovery. The majority of crowdsourcing initiatives developed by libraries and archives are transcription-based projects. In contrast, this project adopted crowdsourcing for the description of image-based resources. By engaging community members to describe archival photographs that relate to their histories, the descriptive information takes on new, deeper dimensions of meaning. In this way, community-driven description can support diversity, equity and inclusion by involving communities in the construction of their own historical narratives. This presentation will review the outcomes of this methodology, describe future applications, and discuss the broader opportunities this methodology offers for community outreach and engagement.

Speaker: Colleen Farry

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Sonja Sekely-Rowland

Sonja Sekely-Rowland

Visual Resources Curator, University of California, Riverside
avatar for Jacqueline Spafford

Jacqueline Spafford

Image Resources Curator, University of California, Santa Barbara
AR

Annie Rana

Project Manager, Getty Research Institute
TE

Tomoko Emura

Head, Archive Section, Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties
avatar for Colleen Farry

Colleen Farry

Assistant Professor, Digital Services Librarian, The University of Scranton
Colleen Farry is an Assistant Professor and Digital Services Librarian at the University of Scranton where she manages the library's digital collections and related digital projects. She has an MSLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and master's degrees in art history... Read More →


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

21. Curiosity, Critical Inquiry, and Digital Skills in Undergraduate Art History Courses
What would librarianship look like if we increased the range of what we can imagine as creative, scholarly work? Join us in exploring non-traditional activities and assignments in undergraduate art history courses.

Moderator: Michelle Johnson

Curiosity and Critical Practice: Building Reflective, Collaborative Communities

In the course “Curiosity and Critical Practice,” students reflect on the role curiosity and inquiry play in the way we conceptualize ourselves as thinkers. We wonder, together, what does it mean to be curious? How has the practice of observing, looking, and noticing shaped our identities as thinkers, writers, and makers? Students build their capacity to notice and articulate questions, developing a greater sensitivity to how questions shape our environment, our relationships, and identities. Questions in and of themselves are at the center of our work as a class, including our collaboration with a studio arts course where we respond to one another’s questions in the form of images, objects, videos, and more questions. Students find that these diverse modes of critical inquiry and response open up what they can imagine as creative, scholarly work, and help them to become more deeply aware of their own authentic questions.

THIS PRESENTATION WILL BE RECORDED

Speaker: Kate Joranson

Beyond the Essay: Integrating Digital Skills Development into Undergraduate Art History

The essay has long been a standard assessment in art history. With galleries and museums looking for ways of engaging their audiences and educating and entertaining their public, institutions are turning to interactive digital content that is made publicly available. Numerous institutional closures have increased this need. As a result, there is a shift towards a need for art historians to have the technical skills that assists in the development and delivery of such content. This session presents three courses that incorporated non-traditional assignments focusing on digital skills acquisition - a digital exhibit incorporating VR, a visual StoryMap, and a podcast - where students were given the opportunity to develop tangible technical skills in addition to skills more closely associated with art history: critical thinking, analysis, and academic writing. Topics covered include faculty buy-in, outcomes and assignment design, software selection, session delivery online, alongside dos and don’ts for those thinking of supporting similar assignments.

THIS PRESENTATION WILL NOT BE RECORDED

Speaker: Paulina Rousseau

THE Q&A WILL NOT BE RECORDED


Moderators
MJ

Michelle Johnson

University of Toronto

Speakers
avatar for Kate Joranson

Kate Joranson

Head Librarian, Henry Clay Frick Fine Arts Library, University Library System, University of Pittsburgh
PR

Paulina Rousseau

University of Toronto Scarborough Library


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

22. Outreach Convergence: Adapting Programming to COVID-19
Whether reimagining existing programs or creating new ones, librarians sought the opportunity to foster connections between the library and its patrons in the wake of a rapid transition to online learning in the Spring of 2020. This panel will showcase how librarians have embraced community connection in a creative and timely manner using both established and experimental methods, with discussions of how these efforts may persist beyond the socially distant library. Alex O’Keefe and Mackenzie Salisbury will walk through creating a wide range of virtual programming using Instagram as a primary platform. Elisa Hansen will describe the development of the museum’s book discussion group, Literati, from its success as an on-site library program to a virtual format during the pandemic. Anna Boutin-Cooper will discuss the transitioning of an in-person film festival to a completely virtual series of film screenings, through the use of Facebook Live and Open Broadcaster Software (OBS). 


Moderators
LE

Larry Eames

Instruction Librarian & Instructor, Kraemer Family Library, University of Colorado

Speakers
MS

Mackenzie Salisbury

School of Art Institute of Chicago
AB

Anna Boutin-Cooper

Franklin & Marshall College
avatar for Elisa Hansen

Elisa Hansen

Head of Library Services, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art
avatar for Alex O'Keefe

Alex O'Keefe

Research + Instruction Librarian, School of the Art Institute of Chicago


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT

10:00am EDT

Posters On View
The 49th Annual ARLIS/NA conference showcases a wide range of thought-provoking posters highlighting innovative research by colleagues in the art information community. Posters can be viewed at any time throughout the conference. You are welcome to start a conversation with the poster exhibitors through direct messaging, comments, one-on-one video calls. Come back on Thursday May 13 for the Poster Finisssage at 2:30 PM when all poster exhibitors will be on hand for live Q&A.

LIST OF POSTERS AND PRESENTERS

Mapping a Transcendent Life: Using ArcGIS Storymaps to Showcase the Public Art, Monuments, and Murals of Muhammad Ali
Courtney Baron, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville

A Visual History of Quebec's CEGEP Libraries and Other Religious and Civic Building Conversions
Susan Bissonnette, Librarian for Information Sciences, Vanier College (CEGEP)

The Francis Bedford Archive: Nineteenth-Century Architectural Photography in England and Wales
Claralyn Burt, Digital Collections Specialist, Gonzaga University

The Sistine Chapel and the Panama Canal: Energy and Memory in Handmade Artists’ Books
Amanda Clark, Library Director, Whitworth University

The Information Literacy Course in Canadian MFA Programs
Sandra Cowan, Fine Arts Librarian, University of Lethbridge
Marissa Rocca, Student Learning and Engagement Librarian, Grande Prairie College

Every Subject Heading on 100 West Hastings St.
Ana Diab, Collections, Reference + Instruction Librarian, Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Assessing the Impact of Covid-19 on the Use of Art Print and Ebooks at an Academic Library
Mary Anne Dyer, Metadata Catalog Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
Emily Davis Winthrop, Art Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University

Pivoting in a Pandemic: Exploring the Art Book and Building Community in a Virtual Speaker Series
Jessica Evans Brady, Research & Collections Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
Shalimar Fojas White, Herman and Joan Suit Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

If You Can Write, You Can Draw! How I Reconnected with My Love of Drawing During the Pandemic
Jacqueline Fleming, Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian, Indiana University-Bloomington

Creating Accessible Academic Information for All with Wikipedia Editing in Undergraduate Art History Courses
Anna Harper, Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, California State University, Sacramento
Rachel Miller, Art History, California State University, Sacramento
Channing Corbin, B.A. Art History, Student, California State University, Sacramento

Job Sharing during Times of Crisis
Yuki Hibben, Interim Head of Special Collections and Archives & Curator of Books and Art, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

A Call for Connection and Collaboration in Information Literacy Instruction for Studio Arts
Ashley Huot, MLIS candidate at the University of Alberta with a background in studio arts, art education, and community development, University of Alberta (MLIS candidate)

Leveraging Research and Information Management (RIM) Systems in Support of Art and Architecture Faculty
Megan Macken, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Liaison to Art, Art History & Graphic Design, Oklahoma State University

The Kress Digital Archive: Collaboration, Context, and Connections
Shannon Morelli, Archivist, National Gallery of Art

Scan This to See a Cat: A Pilot for Digital Image Collections Outreach around Campus
Maggie Murphy, Visual Art & Humanities Librarian, UNC Greensboro
Brown Biggers, IT Operations Manager, UNC Greensboro

“Could We Work with the Library on This?”: Strategies for Increasing Departmental Engagement as a New Art Liaison Librarian
Claire Payne, Web Services and Data Librarian and Liaison to the Department of Art, Stony Brook University Libraries

Fresh Faces, Sticky Fingers: Public Programming at the Walker Art Center Library
Jennifer Riestenberg, Assistant Librarian, Walker Art Center

Virtual Teaching Collections on the Getty Research Portal: Digital Access Across Institutions
Megan Sallabedra, Research Associate, Getty Research Institute

Converging Fields: Connecting Creative Students to Information Literacy through Art and Design Pedagogies
Virginia Seymour, Research and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design

New Approaches to Embedded Librarianship with Interior Design during the Time of COVID-19
Leah Sherman, Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University

Roadblocks to Assessing Arts Collections for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion
Madison Sullivan, Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Washington

Changing the Arts Canon Through Curated BIPOC Research Guides
Aubree Tillett, Arts & Design Librarian Intern, University of Minnesota Libraries
Deborah Ultan, Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries

Welcome to the Black Art Library
Asmaa Walton, Founder, Black Art Library

Scaffolding Business Research Design Instruction for Art and Design Students
Andrew Wang, Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Oregon

Finding Our Way: Improving Discoverability of Native American and Indigenous Materials
Alice Whiteside, Head, Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Monica Figueroa, Interim Librarian for Inclusive Excellence, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Interpreting Desires: The Experiences of Artists in Archives
Lulu Zilinskas, Recent MLIS graduate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 2:00pm EDT

11:10am EDT

23. New Voices in the Profession
Returning for its fifteenth year, New Voices in the Profession provides professionals new to art librarianship or visual resources the opportunity to present topics from exceptional coursework, such as a master's thesis, or topics with which they are engaged early in their professional life. New professionals are defined as either students in MLIS or Master's programs leading to a career in art librarianship or visual resources, or those within five years of Master's level study. The New Voices session is organized by the Professional Development Committee, ArLiSNAP, and the Gerd Muehsam Award Committee.

Moderators: Courtney Hunt and Meredith Hale

Computer Vision for Visual Arts Collections. Looking at Algorithmic Bias, Transparency, and Labor

The implementation of artificial intelligence and machine learning is increasingly becoming commonplace for visual arts libraries, archives, and museums. In particular, computer vision, a distinct form of machine learning, has been used in arts-based collections to automate digital image analysis through trained algorithms to increase metadata description and collection accessibility. However, machine learning algorithms used for computer vision are known to reflect bias, lack transparency, and significantly impact labor. How can LAMs, as institutions supposedly motivated by equity and access, confront these potentially harmful aspects of computer vision during their use of it? Through analysis of recent case studies, accounts, and literature, this presentation proposes visual arts collection processors can mitigate algorithmic bias by promoting transparency of computer vision models, demonstrating caution, and establishing accountability. The development of capable workforces through the implementation of education and collaboration is also crucial in order to alleviate outsourcing and temporary labor.

Speaker: Jessica Craig

Managing Sensitive Indigenous Materials through Cultural Competency and Community Engagement

Despite the importance of access within the Library and Information Sciences field, in practice when applied to sensitive materials, this value can conflict with Indigenous cultural practices, creating disharmony within Indigenous communities and distance and misunderstanding between Indigenous communities and cultural institutions and LIS workers. Beginning in the 1970s, greater attention to Indigenous communities became a feature of academic discourse, but governments and professional associations moved slowly to change perspective and policy. Cultural competence helps to make sense of differing beliefs about privacy and ownership, and devise more appropriate preservation and access strategies. Effective community engagement can help to repair and foster improved relationships between Indigenous communities and cultural institutions.

Speaker: Edith Mulhern

Exploring Replay Integration of Web-Archived Art Resources in Digital Repositories 

While a growing community of scholars use web archives, they remain under-utilized compared with other digital collections. Particularly for art-related materials, web archives may benefit from display and organization similar to digital repositories of visually rich objects. This talk describes an exploratory use case of newly available open-source tools allowing for such an approach: the digital repository software Archipelago (under development by the Metropolitan New York Library Council) and the Replay.web tool by the Webrecorder project. Summarizing an ingest process of selected websites from the New York Art Resources Consortium’s collections, the talk will consider strategies in treating web archives (both literally and from a UI standpoint) as discrete digital objects, and the implications of directly integrating replay into objects’ pages. The talk will illustrate how these tools and conceptual possibilities are ongoingly derived from community-driven, collaborative processes with open-source methods and goals.

Speaker: Jack Patterson

Why Have There Been No Great Art Libraries: The Role of Radical Cataloging in the Reassessment of Art History

During the past year, there has been a global reckoning with systemic racism, misogyny, transphobia, and xenophobia. As institutions look inwards at the ways they can dismantle ongoing systems of oppression, academia must also look at how they codify these ideologies through Eurocentric canons. Art History is one such field. However, as a highly interdisciplinary subject, it presents a unique foundation on which to restructure these frameworks. This essay dissects the role that cataloging plays in reinforcing the canon within art libraries and how a radical cataloging approach can diversify research and representation within art history as a field.

Speaker: Janna Singer-Baefsky

Moderators
avatar for Meredith Hale

Meredith Hale

Metadata Librarian, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
CH

Courtney Hunt

Art & Design Librarian and Assistant Professor, Fine Arts Library, The Ohio State University Libraries

Speakers
JC

Jessica Craig

2021 Gerd Muehsam Award recipient, UCLA MLIS 2021 Candidate
EM

Edith Mulhern

Library Assistant, Penn Libraries, Drexel University MSLIS expected completion June 2022
JP

Jack Patterson

NYARC Web Archiving Fellow, Frick Art Reference Library, MSLIS/MA Art History Candidate, Pratt Institute
JS

Janna Singer-Baefsky

2020 Celine Palatsky Travel Award recipient, Digital Assistant David Zwirner Gallery, Pratt Institute MS LIS Fall 2020


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

11:10am EDT

24. Outreach in the Time of COVID-19: How Academic Art Libraries Are Pivoting Their Services to a Virtual Environment
This year has changed how arts librarians provide support and outreach to students, faculty, and researchers. Due to the pandemic and library closures, many arts librarians in academic libraries quickly pivoted their services to a virtual environment. With the changing nature of the pandemic, communication and outreach is critical in relaying library services and research support. This lightning talk session will highlight six academic arts librarians and how they have adapted their outreach methods and support online. Given that this session is a collaboration between ARLIS/NA and the ACRL/Arts Section, the lightning round presentations included represent the varied disciplines within the umbrella of visual and performing arts librarianship in academic libraries.

Moderators: Tiffany Bailey, Courtney Baron, Tess Colwell and Leah Sherman

Speakers: Anna Clare Harper, Megan Lotts, Marty Miller, Katy Parker, Sha Towers and Joshua Yang. 

Moderators
avatar for Courtney Baron (she/her)

Courtney Baron (she/her)

Director of the Bridwell Art Library, University of Louisville
Courtney Baron is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Bridwell Art Library at the University of Louisville. She is the Moderator of the Academic Division, Travel Awards Committee member, and Senior Co-Chair of the 2021 SEI workshop.
TB

Tiffany Bailey

Manager, J. Erik Jonsson Central Library, Fine Arts
TC

Tess Colwell

Yale University Library
avatar for Leah Sherman

Leah Sherman

Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University
Leah Sherman (she/hers) is the Visual & Performing Arts Librarian at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida. She serves as the library liaison for all six departments within the College of Fine Arts as well as the FSU Museum of Fine Arts, The Ringling Museum in Sarasota... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anna Clare Harper

Anna Clare Harper

Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, University Library, California State University, Sacramento
ML

Megan Lotts

Art Librarian, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
avatar for Marty Miller

Marty Miller

Art and Design Librarian, Louisiana State University
I am the liaison for the College of Art and Design, which includes the Schools of Art, Architecture, Interior Design, Graphic Design and Landscape Architecture.  I have degrees in Fine Art, Art History and Library and Information Science.  My research areas are visual literacy... Read More →
avatar for Katy Parker

Katy Parker

Humanities Liaison Librarian for Fine Arts, University of Texas at Austin
avatar for Sha Towers

Sha Towers

Associate Dean for Research & Engagement, Baylor University
I'm the co-moderator of the ARLIS/NA Book Art SIG, founder and curator of the Baylor Book Arts Collection, art librarian, theatre librarian, and associate dean for research & engagement for the Baylor University Libraries. I'm also the co-author of Liaison Engagement Success: A Practical... Read More →
JY

Joshua Yang

Georgia State University


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

11:10am EDT

25. Adaptive Strategies for Collection Development, Access, and Management
This panel will explore emerging and evolving patterns in collection development and management. The presentations highlight the importance of situational responsiveness at all stages of collections' life cycles – from sourcing and acquisitions, to processing and discoverability, to deaccessioning. Joey Vincennie considers the art book fair as a powerful site for collection development and community building and shares the results of a survey he conducted on how art librarians utilize art book fairs. Simone Fujita discusses her approach to critical library collection development for the Getty Research Institute’s African American Art History Initiative. Hannah Marshall presents an archival implementation case study from the Chinati Foundation, exploring the team’s pandemic response through its adapted project plan and redefined notions of equitable access. Anna Flinchbaugh examines the community ramifications of different deaccessioning strategies. Taken together, these presentations provide a holistic view of how to create, nurture, and maintain a thriving research ecosystem.

Moderator: Amy Ballmer

The Other Side of the Archives: Multifaceted Library Collection Development for the African American Art History Initiative

The Getty Research Institute’s African American Art History Initiative is an effort to support advanced research and new scholarship on Black American artists. Press coverage of the Initiative has focused on archival acquisitions (including those of Betye Saar, Paul R. Williams, and the Johnson Publishing Company); however, collection development efforts are not solely within the realm of special collections. The Getty Library has considerably expanded its holdings on multidisciplinary Black American art and artists through the acquisition of print materials and electronic resources. Simone Fujita (Bibliographer, African American Art, Getty Research Institute) will discuss her work leading library collection development for the Initiative, share the ways in which the Getty’s resources can serve as a complement to existing African American art research sites, and provide helpful suggestions for colleagues in the field who are looking to broaden their own library collections in a critically inclusive way.

Speaker: Simone Fujita

Building Roots from Dead Trees: Community-Centered Deaccession Practices

Librarians across the profession are navigating the apparent contradiction of meeting an increased need for connection and engagement with decreased budgets and other resources. This presentation uses the often-dreaded task of weeding to illuminate the ways in which library choices can either further exacerbate the negative issues created by neoliberal policies and austerity measures or resist them. Data-driven initiatives – including OCLC's GreenGlass, Baker & Taylor's Sustainable Shelves, and homegrown machine learning projects – are contrasted with community-based solutions like weeding parties, book sales, and programming structured around deaccessioned materials. This presentation recognizes all weeding decisions to be a matter of complex negotiation to suit individual library's resources, including available space, labor, time, community engagement, and funding. Rather than attempting to suggest a one-size-fits-all solution, it instead highlights the importance of including externalities and secondary impacts in decision making.

Speaker: Anna Flinchbaugh

“How Do Art Librarians Art Book Fair?”: Art Book Fairs As Collection Development

Strategies for collecting in libraries require multiple modes and methods. Over the past decade, art book fairs have emerged as an exciting and worthwhile venue for collecting artists’ books and other special collections materials. Occurring internationally and across the United States, the attendance of librarians at art book fairs continue to rise with the overall popularity of these fairs. Despite this growth, there is a lack of professional literature in the field that examines how and why art librarians utilize art book fairs especially in relation to collection development.

After observing this gap, Joey Vincennie created a survey as an attempt to provide data to further this research. In the fall of 2020, Vincennie distributed an online survey and conducted a literature review. This presentation considers what makes an art book fair, shares the findings of the online survey and literature review, and finally reinforces the important social aspects that art book fairs offer to librarians and the art community.

Speaker: Joey Vincennie

Processing During the Pandemic: A Case Study

This presentation will explore the pandemic's impact on the two-year project to process the archives of the Chinati Foundation, a contemporary art museum in Marfa, Texas founded by the artist Donald Judd. Like many arts institutions, the foundation closed to the public in March 2020 and staff shifted to remote work. However, archival processing cannot be done from home, so the pandemic created significant logistical challenges to this project. This presentation will explore the Chinati Archives' pandemic response in two ways: First, through a discussion of tools and workflows used to keep the project on schedule. Second, by exploring how the team redefined “equitable online access” in response to the pandemic’s impact on remote work, online education and its disproportionate impact on specific communities. Ultimately, the project team revised our plan for collection management and dissemination in order to align with that expanded definition.

Speaker: Hannah Marshall

Moderators
AB

Amy Ballmer

Chair of Library, Teaching, Learning & Collection Development, Pratt Institute

Speakers
avatar for Simone Fujita

Simone Fujita

Bibliographer, African American Art, Getty Research Institute
AF

Anna Flinchbaugh

Pratt Institute
avatar for Joey Vincennie (he/him)

Joey Vincennie (he/him)

MSLIS/ MA History of Art and Design 2021, Pratt Institute
Joey Vincennie is an art librarian and art historian. His research interests include artists’ books, art book fairs, public art, artist-run spaces, artist led activism, and NYC history and visual culture. He is writing his MA thesis on the curation of Franklin Furnace’s Window... Read More →
HM

Hannah Marshall

Chinati Foundation


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

11:10am EDT

26. International Perspectives on Photo Archives Documenting the Transformation of Cultural-Heritage Sites
Since the invention of photography, this medium has been used in archaeological missions and surveys to document the process of discovery, mapping, and interpretation of historic sites. The photo archives collected by art libraries over several decades can be used to analyze how archaeological and cultural-heritage sites have changed over time, due to urbanization, neglect, or destruction, particularly in conflict zones.

What do these archives tell us about the discovery, transformation and reception of the cultural- heritage landscape? How have archaeological and historic buildings been documented in different parts of the world? Who are the agents of discovery and documentation that created these archives?

The panel organized by the International Relations Committee offers cross-cultural perspectives on how heritage sites have been transformed, across geographic boundaries and historical periods, with four case studies focusing on the Middle East region, Italy, and the city of Havana, Cuba.

Moderators: Spyros Koulouris, and Isotta Poggi (Q&A)

Broadening Perspectives on the Ancient Villages of Northern Syria: Contextualizing and Opening Photographic Archives

March 2021 marks the tenth anniversary of the ongoing Syrian civil war. The UNESCO World Heritage site known as the Ancient Villages of Northern Syria recognizes the significance of 40 of the 700 villages dating to the first–seventh centuries CE located in the region; they were placed on UNESCO’s list of world heritage in danger in 2013. This region came to wider scholarly attention as a result of the publications from Howard Crosby Butler’s survey expeditions to this region at the turn of the twentieth century. The publications and the expeditions' photographic records were critical to establishing a canon of architectural remains on which scholars continue to rely. In 2016, Dumbarton Oaks’ Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) acquired a collection of 8,000 photographs of over 100 sites from this region taken in the 1990s by the historian Frank Kidner, which complements ICFA’s holdings of a copy of the Butler photographs as well as other collections documenting late Roman and Medieval monuments in Syria. Kidner’s travels were inspired both by Butler’s publications and a personal interest in the development of early Christian architecture. Kidner’s interests should, however, not be seen as entirely independent from his familiarity with Butler’s publications, which presented a strong focus on the Christian architectural remains, notwithstanding that domestic architecture was the largest surviving architectural type in the region. Despite Kidner’s prioritization of the Christian remains, his photographs also provide evidence of everyday life in rural settlements of the twentieth century. Given the current situation in Syria, such photographic archives offer critical resources for scholars studying the distant and recent past. At the same time, cataloguing approaches have an important influence on how these archives are received and what exposure these images get. This talk considers how archival collections can perpetuate scholarly biases and offers suggestions of how to address these imbalances by employing strategies such as uploading our collection to Wikimedia and establishing Wikidata entries in order to benefit from crowdsourcing.

Speakers: Bettina Smith and Stephanie Caruso

The Contribution of Early Photo-Archives to the Conservation of the Archaeological Heritage: The Case-Study of K.A.C. Creswell’s Photographs of the Near East 

Early photo-archives are becoming more and more a primary source of information for Near Eastern archaeology. This trend is undoubtedly positive for the archaeological discipline. However, archive studies require precise skills in archive methods, established cataloguing procedures, and shared standards on the systems for publishing data, in order to fully exploit the potential of their information. Currently, the archaeological community looks with increasing attention to archives, but has not yet established enough the common practices as for their management, particularly as regards the publication of data. The present contribution concentrates on a specific source of information, i.e. the early photographs taken in the 1920s by K.A.C. Creswell in Mesopotamia, Syria and Jordan. The illustrated examples aims to point out the main types of information that can be inferred from early photo-archives: the state of the monuments prior to recent damage or destruction processes; the reconstruction of the provenance of archaeological items; the history of conservation interventions on a monument, if any; the modification of the landscape in which the monuments currently stand – just to quote the main ones. 

Speaker: Stefano Anastasio

Personal Photographic Archives: Involuntary Witnesses 

The Photographic Archive of the American Academy in Rome consists of several invaluable and specialized collections of photographs on archaeology, architecture and art, as well as landscape architecture. They represent an exceptional record of the activity of notable personalities, master photographers as well as scholars, active from the second half of the 19th century to recent times. Created either by an archaeologist, an architect, or an art historian - someone who captures an event in the course of investigating his or her own research or travel documentation - a personal photographic archive may become an invaluable documentary source for studying historic and archaeological sites.

The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the importance of specific personal photographic archives (those of Esther B. Van Deman, Ernest Nash and of Richard W. Ayers, among others) as coincidental witnesses of the transformation of cultural heritage sites, mostly in Italy, from the beginning of the 20th century through post-WWII.

Speaker: Lavinia Ciuffa

The Havana Archive Project: A Project of Perseverance

Just over a year ago at the start of 2020, the Hampshire College Library launched the Havana Archive Project, an Open Access digital photographic archive containing over 8,000 photographs of the 1,055 most significant buildings in the Historic Center of Havana, Cuba (as determined by Dr. Eusebio Leal, Director of the Office of the Historian) at the beginning of the restoration of Havana in the early 1980s.

Begun in 2012, the project was a collaboration between Jacqueline Hayden, Professor Emerita of Film and Photography, and students from Hampshire College with Plan Maestro, Office of the Historian. The digital archive is hosted by the Five College Compass: Digital Collections and the Center for Research Libraries.

The Center for Research Libraries’ Latin American Materials Project (LAMP) awarded Hampshire College a grant back in 2015 to create metadata and complete the digitization of the thousands of photographs documenting these buildings (declared World Heritage Monuments by UNESCO in 1982) in the center of Havana.

This presentation will talk about the timeline of the project, how many collaborators it took to come to fruition, and then a case study in how the Havana Archive Project was used in a class at Hampshire College in the fall of 2020.

Speakers: Rachel Beckwith and Jacqueline Hayden

Moderators
avatar for Spyros Koulouris

Spyros Koulouris

Collections Services and Photograph Archivist, I Tatti The Harvard Univ. Center for Italian Renaissance Studies
avatar for Isotta Poggi

Isotta Poggi

Associate Curator of Photographs, Getty Research Institute

Speakers
avatar for Bettina Smith

Bettina Smith

Manager, Image Collections & Fieldwork Archives, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
SC

Stephanie Caruso

Postdoctoral Fellow in Byzantine Art and Archaeology, Dumbarton Oaks
avatar for Lavinia Ciuffa

Lavinia Ciuffa

Photographic Archive Curator, American Academy in Rome
avatar for Rachel Beckwith

Rachel Beckwith

Director, Harold F. Johnson Library, Hampshire College
avatar for Stefano Anastasio

Stefano Anastasio

Archaeologist, Ministero della Cultura, Soprintendenza, Firenze
Archaeologist, specialist in Ancient Near East. Currently storehouse-keeper of the archaeological deposits and in charge of the digitization of the archaeological photo-archive of the Superintendency of Florence. He participated in archaeological excavations and surveys in Italy... Read More →
JH

Jacqueline Hayden

Professor Emerita of Film and Photography, Hampshire College, CA, United States, and Director of the Havana Archive Project; Project Director of PRAHA, Puerto Rico Architectural Heritage Archive


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:10am - 12:30pm EDT

12:20pm EDT

Exhibit Hall: Dedicated Exhibit Time
The Exhibit Hall is open throughout the conference and provides opportunities to network with conference vendors through open chat, news/activity feeds, one-on-one conversations or video calls, and with video demo rooms. This dedicated time slot takes place between conference sessions giving attendees a chance to browse or engage with vendors at their leisure.

Thursday May 13, 2021 12:20pm - 1:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

27. A Way Forward for Working Parents & Caregivers
Being a parent or caregiver before coronavirus (COVID-19) dominated 2020 and was no easy undertaking, but the pandemic has illuminated some of the opportunities and challenges of these important roles within the workplace. This session will explore the perspectives of art information professionals who are parents & caregivers in Canada and the United States as they navigate work and life during this unprecedented crisis. It will also consider what lies ahead.

Topics discussed will include advocacy and support for work-life needs, family leave policies, and the closing of gaps in diversity, inclusion, and equity in the workplace. The audience for this discussion includes parents & caregivers, librarians, and library support staff, managers and directors, and other professionals.

This session will be recorded and made available through the conference platform for 30 days after the conference. It will not be considered for inclusion in the ARLIS/NA Humanities Commons

Moderator: Adèle Flannery

Speakers: Tina Lidogoster, Jill Luedke and Lori Salmon

Moderators
avatar for Adèle Flannery

Adèle Flannery

CPAC Local Arrangements chair, Visual Arts and Design Librarian, Bibliothèque des arts, Université du Québec à Montréal

Speakers
TL

Tina Lidogoster

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
JL

Jill Luedke

Art & Architecture Librarian, Temple University
Reference & Instruction Library at Temple University. Subject Specialist for Art & Architecture.
avatar for Lori Salmon

Lori Salmon

Head, Institute of Fine Arts Library, New York University


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

28. Collaborative Institutional Problem-Solving: Exploring DEI Initiatives and Five Case Studies Across Libraries and Museums
Institutions have long espoused the values of diversity, equity, and inclusion, but have been challenged in making real change. The twin public health crises of the COVID19 pandemic and racial injustice have demonstrated how much “lip service” is paid more so than action. How do we pivot when broad-based reform is only just beginning in many workplaces? These two papers highlight methods for action that detail inward facing initiatives to reform workplaces cultures, as well as outward facing public initiatives to engage stakeholders. The presenters will share five case studies to encourage the audience to reflect on how they can make an impact at their institutions in the midst of the profound changes to our workplaces and our lives.

Moderator: Katy Parker

Fostering Collaborative Institutional Cultures through DEI Initiatives

The presenters will highlight four of their experiences at three institutions that have implemented a variety of collaborative diversity-leaning experiences: a reading group with a feminist social justice agenda; an institution-wide discussion group program bringing members of different departments together; a collaborative annotated bibliography circulated among colleagues; and a grassroots-led DEI group meeting during lunch. These forums provide a truly unique space where advanced- and early-career professionals can come together with equal footing to learn and practice both vulnerability and humility. It is the goal of this presentation to argue that, beyond what should be the obvious benefits of championing change toward equity in our profession and communities, there is institutional value in taking time during the workday to explore DEI learning and action together as a professional community.

Speakers: Claralyn Burt and K. Sarah Ostrach

Learning Out Loud: Moving Toward a More Inclusive Architecture Library through Dialogue and Action

The profession of architecture and that of librarianship have two core aspects in common: that they are both rooted in the legacy of Western-centric epistemologies and resultant knowledge production and dissemination systems; and without intervention, will not change rapidly enough to be relevant to current and future students. The Ricker Library of Architecture and Art and Illinois School of Architecture (ISoA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are collaboratively addressing these challenges, in order to create something more inclusive, student-centered, and sustainable. The project highlighted is twofold in action: decenter the canon in the curriculum while convening public conversation on philosophical and pragmatic implications. The presentation will discuss the initiative, present early findings from the survey and focus groups, and lessons learned from the experience. It is the author’s hope to help spur the audience’s imaginations to figuring out what convergences lay in their own institutions.

Speakers: Emilee Mathews and Soumya Dasgupta

Moderators
KP

Katy Parker

Humanities Liaison Librarian to the Fine Arts, UT Austin

Speakers
EM

Emilee Mathews

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
CB

Claralyn Burt

Gonzaga University
KS

K. Sarah Ostrach

Yale University
SD

Soumya Dasgupta

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

29. A Collective Journey to the Creation of Library Exhibition Standards
In Spring 2020 the ARLIS/NA Exhibitions SIG created an Exhibition Standards Task Force to produce industry-wide standards for library exhibitions. In this session, representatives of the task force will present on the process and methodology used to inform the creation of the standards. Special collections librarians, archivists, art librarians, and other stewards of artifacts and rare materials will gain a comprehensive view of the areas concerning the planning and execution of exhibitions that could be applicable to their own setting, including philosophy and policy, curating, the use of digital technology, issues of diversity and inclusion, facilities considerations, conversation, marketing, financial, and evaluation. Participants in this session will also have the opportunity to engage in conversation with the Task Force representatives to help refine the standards in advance of final publication on the ARLIS/NA website in later 2021.

Moderator: Carmen Peters
       
Speakers: Allison Comrie, Kristi Kohl, Elizabeth Meinke and Carol Ng-He

Moderators
avatar for Carmen Peters

Carmen Peters

Librarian for Fine Arts and Philosophy, University of Waterloo

Speakers
CN

Carol Ng-He

Digital Collections Curator, Center for the Art in East Asia, University of Chicago
AC

Allison Comrie

Librarian, Alberta University of the Arts
KK

Kristi Kohl

Archives Specialist, Archives & Special Collections, Max Chambers Library, University of Central Oklahoma
EM

Elizabeth Meinke

Exhibitions Coordinator, Case Western Reserve University


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

2:30pm EDT

Poster Finissage: Meet the Poster Presenters
This special event is a live Q&A opportunity with all of the poster presenters.  

Did you know that the word "Finissage" is a play on the French word "Vernissage" - meaning an art exhibition opening? Finissage is used in Montreal to refer to the closing of an art exhibition.

Read up on the history of the expression Vernissage by following this link:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vernissage

LIST OF POSTERS AND PRESENTERS

Mapping a Transcendent Life: Using ArcGIS Storymaps to Showcase the Public Art, Monuments, and Murals of Muhammad Ali
Courtney Baron, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville

A Visual History of Quebec's CEGEP Libraries and Other Religious and Civic Building Conversions
Susan Bissonnette, Librarian for Information Services, Vanier College (CEGEP)

The Francis Bedford Archive: Nineteenth-Century Architectural Photography in England and Wales
Claralyn Burt, Digital Collections Specialist, Gonzaga University

The Sistine Chapel and the Panama Canal: Energy and Memory in Handmade Artists’ Books
Amanda Clark, Library Director, Whitworth University

The Information Literacy Course in Canadian MFA Programs
Sandra Cowan, Fine Arts Librarian, University of Lethbridge
Marissa Rocca, Student Learning and Engagement Librarian, Grande Prairie College

Every Subject Heading on 100 West Hastings St.
Ana Diab, Collections, Reference + Instruction Librarian, Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Assessing the Impact of Covid-19 on the Use of Art Print and Ebooks at an Academic Library
Mary Anne Dyer, Metadata Catalog Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
Emily Davis Winthrop, Art Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University

Pivoting in a Pandemic: Exploring the Art Book and Building Community in a Virtual Speaker Series
Jessica Evans Brady, Research & Collections Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
Shalimar Fojas White, Herman and Joan Suit Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

If You Can Write, You Can Draw! How I Reconnected with My Love of Drawing During the Pandemic
Jacqueline Fleming, Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian, Indiana University-Bloomington

Creating Accessible Academic Information for All with Wikipedia Editing in Undergraduate Art History Courses
Anna Harper, Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, California State University, Sacramento
Rachel Miller, Art History, California State University, Sacramento
Channing Corbin, B.A. Art History, Student, California State University, Sacramento

Job Sharing during Times of Crisis
Yuki Hibben, Interim Head of Special Collections and Archives & Curator of Books and Art, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

A Call for Connection and Collaboration in Information Literacy Instruction for Studio Arts
Ashley Huot, MLIS candidate at the University of Alberta with a background in studio arts, art education, and community development, University of Alberta (MLIS candidate)

Leveraging Research and Information Management (RIM) Systems in Support of Art and Architecture Faculty
Megan Macken, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Liaison to Art, Art History & Graphic Design, Oklahoma State University

The Kress Digital Archive: Collaboration, Context, and Connections
Shannon Morelli, Archivist, National Gallery of Art

Scan This to See a Cat: A Pilot for Digital Image Collections Outreach around Campus
Maggie Murphy, Visual Art & Humanities Librarian, UNC Greensboro
Brown Biggers, IT Operations Manager, UNC Greensboro

“Could We Work with the Library on This?”: Strategies for Increasing Departmental Engagement as a New Art Liaison Librarian
Claire Payne, Web Services and Data Librarian and Liaison to the Department of Art, Stony Brook University Libraries

Fresh Faces, Sticky Fingers: Public Programming at the Walker Art Center Library
Jennifer Riestenberg, Assistant Librarian, Walker Art Center

Virtual Teaching Collections on the Getty Research Portal: Digital Access Across Institutions
Megan Sallabedra, Research Associate, Getty Research Institute

Converging Fields: Connecting Creative Students to Information Literacy through Art and Design Pedagogies
Virginia Seymour, Research and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design

New Approaches to Embedded Librarianship with Interior Design during the Time of COVID-19
Leah Sherman, Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University

Roadblocks to Assessing Arts Collections for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion
Madison Sullivan, Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Washington

Changing the Arts Canon Through Curated BIPOC Research Guides
Aubree Tillett, Arts & Design Librarian Intern, University of Minnesota Libraries
Deborah Ultan, Arts & Design Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries

Welcome to the Black Art Library
Asmaa Walton, Founder, Black Art Library

Scaffolding Business Research Design Instruction for Art and Design Students
Andrew Wang, Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Oregon

Finding Our Way: Improving Discoverability of Native American and Indigenous Materials
Alice Whiteside, Head, Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Monica Figueroa, Interim Librarian for Inclusive Excellence, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Interpreting Desires: The Experiences of Artists in Archives
Lulu Zilinskas, Recent MLIS graduate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill







Moderators
GM

Gwen Mayhew

Head, Collection Access, Canadian Centre for Architecture

Speakers
MA

Mary Anne Dyer

Metadata Catalog Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Yuki Hibben

Yuki Hibben

Interim Head of Special Collections and Archives and Curator of Books and Art, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Shalimar Fojas White

Shalimar Fojas White

Herman and Joan Suit Librarian, Harvard University
avatar for Alice Whiteside

Alice Whiteside

Head, Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
she/her/hers
avatar for Andrew Wang

Andrew Wang

Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Oregon
avatar for Sandra Cowan

Sandra Cowan

Librarian, University of Lethbridge Library
Sandra Cowan is the liaison librarian for English, Modern Languages, Religious Studies and the Faculty of Fine Arts at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada.  She has research interests in digital humanities, scholarly communications, and research methods of creative w... Read More →
avatar for Leah Sherman

Leah Sherman

Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University
Leah Sherman (she/hers) is the Visual & Performing Arts Librarian at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida. She serves as the library liaison for all six departments within the College of Fine Arts as well as the FSU Museum of Fine Arts, The Ringling Museum in Sarasota... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Clark

Amanda Clark

Library Director, Whitworth University
avatar for Courtney Baron (she/her)

Courtney Baron (she/her)

Director of the Bridwell Art Library, University of Louisville
Courtney Baron is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Bridwell Art Library at the University of Louisville. She is the Moderator of the Academic Division, Travel Awards Committee member, and Senior Co-Chair of the 2021 SEI workshop.
ED

Emily Davis Winthrop

Arts Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
MS

Megan Sallabedra

Research Associate, Getty Research Institute
avatar for Jessica Evans Brady

Jessica Evans Brady

Research and Collections Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
I'm a mid-career art librarian currently working at Harvard's Fine Arts Library and serving my third year on the executive committee of the ARLIS/NA New England Chapter, now as Past Chair. I'm always happy to talk about art library career paths, reference, outreach, events, collection... Read More →
avatar for Maggie Murphy

Maggie Murphy

Visual Art & Humanities Librarian, UNC Greensboro
avatar for Monica Figueroa

Monica Figueroa

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
she/her(s); social justice, equity, and inclusion in libraries
avatar for Anna Clare Harper

Anna Clare Harper

Fine and Performing Arts Librarian, University Library, California State University, Sacramento
SM

Shannon Morelli

Archivist, National Gallery of Art
avatar for Madison Sullivan

Madison Sullivan

Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Washington
RM

Rachel Miller

Assistant Professor, CSU Sacramento
JR

Jennifer Riestenberg

Assistant Librarian, Walker Art Center
avatar for Ana Diab

Ana Diab

Emily Carr University of Art and Design
CB

Claralyn Burt

Gonzaga University
MM

Megan Macken

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Oklahoma State University
avatar for Claire Payne

Claire Payne

Stony Brook University
MR

Marissa Rocca

Student Learning and Engagement Librarian, Grande Prairie College


Thursday May 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:15pm EDT

3:15pm EDT

Closing Keynote Address: The Museum Is Not Enough
Architect, editor, and curator Giovanna Borasi joined the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in 2005, first as Curator of Contemporary Architecture (2005-10), then as Chief Curator (2014-19). She has been the Director of the CCA since January 2020. Borasi’s work explores alternative ways of practicing and evaluating architecture, considering the impact of contemporary environmental, political and social issues on urbanism and the built environment. She studied architecture at the Politecnico di Milano, worked as an editor of Lotus International (1998–2005) and Lotus Navigator (2000– 2004) and was Deputy Editor in Chief of Abitare (2011–2013). One of Borasi’s latest curatorial projects is a three-part documentary film series that reconsiders architecture’s relationship to and understanding of home and homelessness, living alone, and the elderly. The first film, What It Takes to Make a Home (2019), screened at film festivals and institutions worldwide, including at the United Nations headquarters in New York City as part of the 58th Session of the Commission for Social Development. The series is part of the CCA’s one-year investigation Catching Up with Life, which explores how architecture and urbanism could better respond to changing notions of family, love, friendship, work, labour, automation, governance, ownership, debt, consumerism, retirement, digital omnipresence, and death that have all shifted, multiplied, and diversified in meaning.

Moderators
GM

Gwen Mayhew

Head, Collection Access, Canadian Centre for Architecture

Speakers
avatar for Giovanna Borasi

Giovanna Borasi

Director, Canadian Centre for Architecture
Architect, editor, and curator Giovanna Borasi joined the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in 2005, first as Curator of Contemporary Architecture (2005-10), then as Chief Curator (2014-19). She has been the Director of the CCA since January 2020.Borasi’s work explores alternative... Read More →


Thursday May 13, 2021 3:15pm - 4:30pm EDT

4:45pm EDT

Membership Meeting & Closing Remarks
Annual ARLIS/NA Membership & Business Meeting hosted by the Executive Board and open to all ARLIS/NA members, please join your colleagues at the ARLIS/NA Annual Membership and Business Meeting for updates on society activities and remembrances, a preview of ARLIS/NA 50th Anniversary events, and information about the 2022 conference in Chicago. The new Executive Board will take office during this meeting.

  • Call to order & President's report (Amy Trendler)
  • Remembrances (Please contact Amy Trendler, aetrendler@bsu.edu, to share names of colleagues who should be included)
  • Secretary's report (Rachel Resnik)
  • Treasurer's report (Doug Litts)
  • Editorial Director's report (Roger Lawson)
  • 2022 Annual Conference
  • ARLIS/NA Board Transition (Amy Trendler)
  • Incoming President's remarks (Mark Pompelia)
  • Question and answer period 
  • Adjourn (Mark Pompelia)

Stick around after the meeting for virtual mingling with your colleagues.

Speakers
avatar for Roger Lawson (he, him, his)

Roger Lawson (he, him, his)

Executive Librarian, National Gallery of Art
ARLIS/NA Editorial Director
RR

Rachel Resnik

ARLIS/NA Secretary
DL

Doug Litts

ARLIS/NA Treasurer
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, University Libraries Ball State University, ARLIS/NA President
avatar for Mark Pompelia

Mark Pompelia

Visual + Material Resource Librarian, Rhode Island School of Design, ARLIS/NA Vice-President / President Elect


Thursday May 13, 2021 4:45pm - 5:55pm EDT

5:00pm EDT

Lounge 5 à 7
This is where you want to be if you want to gather with friends or meet new ones! Think of it as a virtual version of the hallway chat or the hotel lobby catch-up. Open 24/7 to accommodate ARLIS attendees from around the world. Join the conversation in Remo by double-clicking on any open seat.

https://live.remo.co/e/lounge-5-a-7-19

Thursday May 13, 2021 5:00pm - 7:00pm EDT
 
Friday, May 14
 

7:00am EDT

Continue the conversation: Lounge matin is open!
This is where you want to be if you want to gather with friends or meet new ones! Think of it as a virtual version of the hallway chat or the hotel lobby catch-up. Open 24/7 to accommodate ARLIS attendees from around the world. Join the conversation in Remo by double-clicking on any open seat.



Friday May 14, 2021 7:00am - 12:00pm EDT

11:00am EDT

Workshop III (FULLY-BOOKED): Teaching in the Art Library: From Pedagogy to Praxis
While teaching is often a core responsibility of art librarianship, many MLIS programs do not adequately prepare their students. This beginner’s workshop is intended to provide a foundational introduction to teaching, setting up librarians who are either new to the field or simply new to teaching for success. This workshop will cover a wide range of skills and pedagogy necessary to any new teacher, including lesson planning, creating outcomes based learning objectives, a basic introduction to pedagogy and the scholarship of teaching & learning, and more as time allows, delivered in an active, engaging manner by fellow expert art librarian teachers. Workshop participants will work individually and in groups to explore the content, and will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience creating their own learning objectives and lesson plans. Workshop participants will also learn about ways to manage teaching anxiety, tips for communicating with faculty, and will have a basic introduction to curriculum mapping as it benefits a program of instruction at their institution. This workshop will require some pre-work and readings.

Speakers: Courtney Baron, Anna Boutin-Cooper and Eva Sclippa

CAP: 25 attendees

Cost: $25

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY-BOOKED

Speakers
AB

Anna Boutin-Cooper

Research & Visual Arts Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College
avatar for Eva Sclippa

Eva Sclippa

First Year Engagement Librarian, UNC Wilmington
Teaching SIG Co-Coordinator
avatar for Courtney Baron (she/her)

Courtney Baron (she/her)

Director of the Bridwell Art Library, University of Louisville
Courtney Baron is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Bridwell Art Library at the University of Louisville. She is the Moderator of the Academic Division, Travel Awards Committee member, and Senior Co-Chair of the 2021 SEI workshop.


Friday May 14, 2021 11:00am - 1:00pm EDT

12:00pm EDT

Continue the conversation: Lounge midi is open!
This is where you want to be if you want to gather with friends or meet new ones! Think of it as a virtual version of the hallway chat or the hotel lobby catch-up. Open 24/7 to accommodate ARLIS attendees from around the world. Join the conversation in Remo by double-clicking on any open seat.

Friday May 14, 2021 12:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

Treasures of McGill Library's Special Collections
Many Montrealers are unaware of the many weird and wonderful things held right downtown at McGill University. The Library has items dating back over four thousand years that make up some of the most important research collections in the world. Like any good collection, there are plenty of gems and surprises.

Register here!


Speakers
CL

Christopher Lyons

Head Librarian, Rare Books & Special Collections, McGill University
Christopher Lyons has been Head Librarian of Rare Books and Special Collections, McGill University since 2017. He joined the McGill Library in 2004 as a liaison librarian at the Osler Library of the History of Medicine, where he was subsequently appointed Head Librarian. Chris has... Read More →


Friday May 14, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Workshop IV: Building Character: Popular Tabletop RPGs and the Importance of Idea Development for Creative Students
SIGN UP before 3pm on Thursday by emailing : m.sawicki@arlisna.org

The tabletop gaming movement began in 1974 with the publishing of Dungeons & Dragons, First Edition. This form of gaming still remains widely popular with college students and young adults, as evidenced by observation of students within the library, interactions with student organizations, and circulation statistics on collections of tabletop RPG books. All of this interest surrounding tabletop gaming is leading academic art and design librarians to explore ways to draw the connections between game development for an RPG campaign and the skills students will use in creative fields, such as creative writing, illustration, sequential arts, script/screenplay writing and more. Successful campaigns are built around an expansive world and story, developed and led by a Game Master. The player must develop a character that fits within this world, with the skills and personality to overcome the challenges developed by the Game Master. This workshop will teach participants the methodology for creating an engaging world and characters to populate it, as well as leading them through creating a character, themselves.

Speaker, Katy Parker

CAP: 30 attendees

Cost: $25

Speakers
KP

Katy Parker

Humanities Liaison Librarian to the Fine Arts, UT Austin


Friday May 14, 2021 2:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

5:00pm EDT

Continue the conversation: Lounge 5 à 7 is open!
This is where you want to be if you want to gather with friends or meet new ones! Think of it as a virtual version of the hallway chat or the hotel lobby catch-up. Open 24/7 to accommodate ARLIS attendees from around the world. Join the conversation in Remo by double-clicking on any open seat.

Friday May 14, 2021 5:00pm - 7:00pm EDT
 
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